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Net providers in piracy deal


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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7522334.stm

 

Six of the UK's biggest net providers have agreed a plan with the music industry to tackle piracy online.

 

The deal, negotiated by the government, will see hundreds of thousands of letters sent to net users suspected of illegally sharing music.

 

Hard core file-sharers could see their broadband connections slowed, under measures proposed by the UK government.

 

BT, Virgin, Orange, Tiscali, BSkyB and Carphone Warehouse have all signed up.

 

Geoff Taylor, chief executive of the BPI, which represents the music industry, said: "All of the major ISPs in the UK now recognise they have a responsibility to deal with illegal file-sharers on their networks."

 

Mr Taylor said it had taken years to persuade ISPs to adopt this view.

 

The plan commits the firms to working towards a "significant reduction" in the illegal sharing of music.

 

It also commits the net firms to develop legal music services. "Conversations are ongoing between record labels and ISPs," said Mr Taylor.

 

The BPI has focused on educational efforts and limited legal action in recent years, in contrast to the US, which has embarked on tens of thousands of lawsuits against alleged file sharers.

 

The six internet service providers have signed a Memorandum of Understanding drawn up by the Department for Business, Enterprise & Regulatory Reform (BERR).

 

The Motion Picture Association of America has also signed up.

 

The BPI said the memorandum covered consumers who were both uploading and downloading music.

 

Mr Taylor said: "The focus is on people sharing files illegally; there is not an acceptable level of file-sharing. Musicians need to be paid like everyone else."

 

He added: "File-sharing (of copyright tracks without permission) is not anonymous, it is not secret, it is against the law."

 

At the same time the government has started a consultation exercise that could result in laws that force net firms to tackle music piracy. A working group will be set up under the auspices of regulator Ofcom to look at effective measures to tackle persistant file-sharers.

 

Mr Taylor said newspaper reports stating that online users could be subject to an annual levy to cover losses from file-sharing were incorrect.

 

"A levy is not an issue under discussion. It has not been discussed between us and government and as far as we are aware it is not on the table."

 

He said: "There should be effective mechanisms in place (to deter file-sharing) and as long as they are effective, we don't mind what they are."

 

The consultation document proposed that hard core file-sharers could have technical measures imposed, such as "traffic management or filtering and marking of legitimate content to facilitate identification".

 

In the past few weeks net firms Virgin and BT have sent letters to some customers identified by the BPI, which represents the UK record industry, as persistent music pirates.

 

 

Before now the BPI has called for a "three-strikes" system which would see net connections of persistent pirates terminated if three warnings went ignored.

 

Many net firms have resisted the call from the BPI and have said it is not their job to act as policemen.

 

Feargal Sharkey, chief executive of British Music Rights, said the plan was "a first step, and a very big step, in what we all acknowledge is going to be quite a long process".

 

Mr Sharkey, formerly lead singer with The Undertones added: "Government, particularly in the UK, has now realised there is an issue, there is a problem there."

 

One BBC News website user Mark, from Hampshire, said he downloaded and shared files illegally and argued customers were "getting their own back".

 

In an e-mail, he said: "I used to run half a dozen record shops in the 80s and saw how far the fat cats of the record industry would go, in milking customers and retailers dry with more hyped rubbish."

 

"Why should I yet again pay for, say, the Beatles' White Album at full whack? I already bought it on LP, eight-track, cassette, and CD! This is those customers getting their own back."

 

"So will this make me sharing a CD with my next-door neighbour over the fence illegal?" he added.

 

Be interesting to see how this one works out.

 

Thing is (as far I know) most musicians will tell you that the real money for them is in gigs and merch anyway. Piracy may have led to them cutting less from record sales but the upturn of this is that ticket prices have increased. In some cases to quite ridiculous levels.

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Be interesting to see how this one works out.

 

Thing is (as far I know) most musicians will tell you that the real money for them is in gigs and merch anyway. Piracy may have led to them cutting less from record sales but the upturn of this is that ticket prices have increased. In some cases to quite ridiculous levels.

 

:lol: Most money is now made from gigs and merchandise BECAUSE OF PIRACY!!

 

My best made is a recording artist, label owner and producer (based in NYC) and thinks that he loses 80% of record sales to piracy.

 

Another mate is a gigging musician, plays sax with Bassment Jaxx and is in Hard-Fi. He supplements his income by teaching.

 

Tours are expensive and risky, hence the high prices.

 

Oh and Feargal Sharkey has been active on this issue for about 5 years.

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Whatever, I didn't say I was totally clued up on this (as I should be). I've been under the impression that a lot of artists have never really seen a lot from record sales anyway as they only get a small cut of each record sold.

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I don't believe the artist is losing out much, but it's the record companies that are losing out now. The artist makes money back from gigs + tours, with not too much really coming from sales as a percentage. Tf they get their music out there more (piracy, basically), it means there's a wider audience to target tours + gigs towards.

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interesting enough, surely theres software out there to protect users though and ways of getting around it. It pisses me off that some ISPs block or severly throttle torrents. I wanted to download the NIN free album they did not long back LEGALLY, over torrents. the torrent link was actually posted on the official NIN site.

 

Radiohead had their album made available over he internet for a donation but again this could have been done through a torrent which would have been throttled again on some ISPs

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I don't get this;  it must be a gimmik move.

 

It's as daft as holding the Post Office responsible for the contents of the letters that go through it's hands.

 

Poor rock stars will be having to fly in last years Lear jet instead of this year's. Like footballers I dont know how they will manage with only six cars instead of ten.

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The BPI said the memorandum covered consumers who were both uploading and downloading music.

 

But as always the only people who'll get done are those who are sharing their music collection balls out with everyone in the world.

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shit.

i download quite a lot of films and tv!

 

I dont think what i do should be illegal though tbh, i download films and if they are good, purchase them, now, if the film makers make good films they will be brought and tv, its only cus ive missed it!

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I wonder if anyone heard Billy Bragg talking about this. For once I agreed with him.

Apparently musicians get 13% of the price. Can you imagine if Lucian Freud or Damian Hirst were told that they'd only get paid 13% of their work.

This is after the distribution, packaging etc are taken out of the equation (no costs for digital downloads).

It's been like this for decades. The record companies effectively 'loan' the advance to the band against future sales, so that the band can pay for recording time.

It's like asking actors to pay for the cameras and film stock.

The record companies are the most parasitic of all the media companies. They didn't act or prepare for the age of digital downloads and, as such, they deserve no support.

Legally it is wrong to download tracks you haven't paid for but morally there's no question.

Radiohead proved that it's possible to disconnect the makers of music from the parasites who hang around them.

Don't be taken in by their tales of being on their arses. When I see a record company exec who didn't go to private school, I'll sympathise.

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Guest elbee909

I wonder if anyone heard Billy Bragg talking about this. For once I agreed with him.

Apparently musicians get 13% of the price. Can you imagine if Lucian Freud or Damian Hirst were told that they'd only get paid 13% of their work.

This is after the distribution, packaging etc are taken out of the equation (no costs for digital downloads).

It's been like this for decades. The record companies effectively 'loan' the advance to the band against future sales, so that the band can pay for recording time.

It's like asking actors to pay for the cameras and film stock.

The record companies are the most parasitic of all the media companies. They didn't act or prepare for the age of digital downloads and, as such, they deserve no support.

Legally it is wrong to download tracks you haven't paid for but morally there's no question.

Radiohead proved that it's possible to disconnect the makers of music from the parasites who hang around them.

Don't be taken in by their tales of being on their arses. When I see a record company exec who didn't go to private school, I'll sympathise.

 

Spot on.  Music industry's been fucking over the majority of talent for years.  They're more worried about the long term future of them being removed from the equation and are just using the piracy bit as a stick to beat the future over the head with.

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What  i dont get about this whole thing is that they have been banging on for years about extremists accessing terrorist materials and peado's getting kiddie porn off the net and how do they police it blah blah etc.

but now as some as some fat cat record companies start losing cash, they can monitor your downloads and send out letters.

ehh?

 

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  • 4 months later...

Mate of mine just got served this week with a letter from a law firm offering him a £2,000 settlement fee, or they'll take him to court. Hasn't downloaded anything since August. :frantic:

 

Tell him to take the £2,000, the court might throw it out.

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Mate of mine just got served this week with a letter from a law firm offering him a £2,000 settlement fee, or they'll take him to court. Hasn't downloaded anything since August. :frantic:

 

Tell him to take the £2,000, the court might throw it out.

i think they'll expect him to pay the £2,000
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I'm well annoyed with orange at the minute, they've done something to my online gaming speeds, and my ping was between 300 and 500 last night. Can't wait to change to Sky in January.

 

Anyway, it'll probably never work and I don't do pirate things and they've still cut my connection so that's a good message to send.

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Mate of mine just got served this week with a letter from a law firm offering him a £2,000 settlement fee, or they'll take him to court. Hasn't downloaded anything since August. :frantic:

 

Surely he must have got a warning or something before they did that?!? Otherwise it might be a fake....

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Mate of mine just got served this week with a letter from a law firm offering him a £2,000 settlement fee, or they'll take him to court. Hasn't downloaded anything since August. :frantic:

 

Tell him to speak to a lawyer.  Whilst it might be a scam, it'd be worth his while to speak to a lawyer in case it is genuine - a file sharer had £16000 damages awarded against them when they failed to turn up to defend the action.

 

If your friend's lawyer has much knowledge of internet piracy law & current events he'll know that the charge has never been argued in UK courts and a strong letter back to the accusing law firm stating in legalese: go on then, try & prove it in court might make the issue go away. 

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