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The South Ossetia Crisis..WW3 now a distinct possiblility...run for the hills!..


pedro111
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All over the news at the moment and I like probably most of you havent got a clue about that area and why they are fighting

 

I pulled this from the BBC website:

 

Q&A: Violence in South Ossetia  

Escalating tensions between Georgia and its breakaway province of South Ossetia have erupted into serious fighting.

 

The separatist administration in South Ossetia has been trying to gain formal independence since breaking away in a civil war in the 1990s.

 

Russia has troops in the region, on a peacekeeping mandate. But Moscow also supports the separatists.

 

What is the status of South Ossetia?

 

South Ossetia has run its own affairs since fighting for independence from Georgia in 1991-92, in the aftermath of the collapse of the Soviet Union.

 

It has declared independence, though this has not been recognised by any other country.

 

Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili has vowed to bring South Ossetia and another breakaway region, Abkhazia, back under full Georgian control.

 

Why do Ossetians want to break away?

 

The Ossetians are a distinct ethnic group originally from the Russian plains just south of the Don river. In the 13th Century, they were pushed southwards by Mongol invasions into the Caucasus mountains, settling along the border with Georgia.

 

South Ossetians want to join up with their ethnic brethren in North Ossetia, which is an autonomous republic within the Russian Federation.

 

Ethnic Georgians are a minority in South Ossetia, accounting for less than one-third of the population.

 

But Georgia rejects even the name, South Ossetia, preferring to call it by the ancient name of Samachablo, or Tskhinvali, after its main city.

 

What triggered the latest crisis?

 

Tension has risen since the election of President Saakashvili in 2004. He offered South Ossetia dialogue and autonomy within a single Georgian state - but in 2006 South Ossetians voted in an unofficial referendum to press their demands for complete independence.

 

In April 2008 Nato said Georgia would be allowed to join the alliance at some point - angering Russia, which opposes the eastward expansion of Nato. Weeks later, Russia stepped up ties with the separatists in Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

 

In July Russia admitted its fighter jets entered Georgian airspace over South Ossetia to "cool hot heads in Tbilisi". Occasional clashes escalated, until six people were reportedly killed by Georgian shelling. Attempts to reach a ceasefire quickly collapsed.

 

Could Russia become directly involved in war?

 

Russia insists it has been acting as a peacekeeper in South Ossetia, rejecting Georgian accusations that it has been supplying arms to the separatists.

 

However, it has vowed to defend its citizens in South Ossetia - of which there are many. More than half of South Ossetia's 70,000 citizens are said to have taken up Moscow's offer of a Russian passport.

 

Russia may view limited military intervention as less risky than recognising South Ossetia's independence, which could lead to all-out war with Georgia.

 

What about Georgia's links to Nato?

 

President Saakashvili has made membership of Nato one of his main goals. Georgia has a close relationship with the United States and has been cultivating ties with Western Europe.

 

There are those who believe that Mr Saakashvili may be hoping to draw Nato into a conflict with Moscow, making their alliance a formal one.

 

But analysts say it is difficult to imagine Nato allowing itself to be drawn into a direct conflict with its Cold War rival after managing to avoid that for so long.

 

 

 

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US forces to deliver Georgia aid

 

President George W Bush has said the US will use military aircraft and naval forces to deliver aid to Georgia following its conflict with Russia.

 

Speaking in Washington, he expressed concern about reports of continuing Russian action in Georgia, and urged Russia to respect a ceasefire accord.

 

Mr Bush hinted that Russia could be jeopardising its international ties.

 

The Kremlin said the US must choose between partnership with Moscow, or with the Georgian leadership.

 

"At some time it will be necessary to choose between supporting this virtual project and [a] real partnership on questions which actually require collective action," said Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov.

 

The BBC's Caroline Wyatt, in Moscow, says the Kremlin's reaction suggests they have been bitterly stung by Mr Bush's comments.

 

But she says Mr Lavrov spoke in the knowledge that the US is unlikely to back up its verbal support for Georgia with any more concrete action.

 

The crisis erupted late on 7 August when Georgian forces bombarded South Ossetia to restore Tbilisi's control over the region, where the majority of people hold Russian passports.

 

Russia quickly became involved, bombing targets in Georgia and sending in troops. Some 100,000 people are estimated to have been displaced by the conflict.

 

A French-brokered ceasefire has been in place between Russia and Georgia since Tuesday, but each side has accused the other of breaking the accord.

 

Mr Bush said Russia's actions had "raised serious questions about its intentions in Georgia and the region".

 

"To begin to repair the damage to its relations with the United States, Europe and other nations, and to begin restoring its place in the world, Russia must keep its word and act to end this crisis."

 

He said he had ordered a series of steps to demonstrate "solidarity with the Georgian people", including sending Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to Tbilisi later this week, and launching a "vigorous and ongoing" humanitarian mission.

 

A C-17 aircraft with humanitarian supplies was already on its way to Georgia, Mr Bush said, and in the following days military aircraft and naval forces would deliver humanitarian and medical supplies.

 

The BBC's Natalia Antelava, in Tbilisi, says Mr Bush's speech was the first piece of good news the Georgian government had received for days.

 

But she said Tbilisi's schools and nurseries were crammed with refugees, many of whom were angry with their leaders for dragging them into a conflict with Russia.

 

'Dismantling artillery'

 

Following Mr Bush's statement, Ms Rice, who will hold talks in France before heading to Tbilisi, also had tough words, saying Russia had "seriously overreached" itself.

 

She told a news conference: "This is not 1968 and the invasion of Czechoslovakia where Russia can threaten a neighbour, occupy a capital, overthrow a government and get away with it. Things have changed."

 

Mr Lavrov responded robustly to US criticism of Russia's continuing military action, admitting that his troops were still inside Georgia near both Gori and the town of Senaki, near the other secessionist region of Abkhazia.

 

He said Russian peacekeepers were dismantling a "huge amount of armaments, ammunition and explosives" that had been left unattended.

 

"This arsenal has to be defused of course so that it cannot pose any threat to civilians," he said.

 

'Massacres on our doorstep'

 

France, which currently holds the EU presidency, has been spearheading diplomatic efforts to solve the crisis.

 

President Nicolas Sarkozy visited both Tbilisi and Moscow on Tuesday, and succeeded in getting both sides to agree to the principles of a peace plan.

 

Russian President Dmitry Medvedev had announced a halt to military action shortly before meeting Mr Sarkozy.

 

EU foreign ministers have been discussing the peace plan, and have agreed to send a group of monitors or peacekeepers to Georgia to monitor the ceasefire - but they want the UN to back the proposal first.

 

"The European Union cannot be indifferent to this war, these massacres on our doorstep," said French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner.

 

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said the UN was ready to facilitate international talks and contribute to possible peacekeeping arrangements in the region.

Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/7559252.stm

 

 

So basically the US is sending troops and the Navy into Georgia under the guise of delivering humanitarian aid, so what happens if they happen to come into contact with the Russians, who are by most reports still merrily wandering around in deepest Georgia?

 

Mr Shit, meet Mr Fan.

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I agree, The Russian and American armies are both in Georgia and less than 100 miles apart.

 

It only takes one idiotic action on behalf of one soldier to esculate this situation.

 

Scary indeed, World Wars can be started on such trivial things and you cant help but get the feeling The Ivan's want a proper fight.

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World War 3 beckons,  I tell thee. This is going to be a s***-storm and we're all going to be conscripted. :frantic:

 

I reckon I'll be safe for a while at 25.  :lol:

 

From what i have heard, drafts go something like this:

 

20-22 year olds first then:

19

18

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30 and so on as and when required.

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World War 3 beckons,  I tell thee. This is going to be a s***-storm and we're all going to be conscripted. :frantic:

 

I reckon I'll be safe for a while at 25.  :lol:

 

From what i have heard drafts go something like this:

 

20-22 year olds first then:

19

18

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30 and so on.

 

Oh, really? Well, suits me fine. :lol:

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World War 3 beckons,  I tell thee. This is going to be a s***-storm and we're all going to be conscripted. :frantic:

 

I reckon I'll be safe for a while at 25.  :lol:

 

From what i have heard drafts go something like this:

 

Scots

20-22 year olds first then:

19

18

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30 and so on.

 

Oh, really? Well, suits me fine. :lol:

 

RLY?

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Perhaps they'll laser them?

 

US boasts of laser weapon's 'plausible deniability'

 

    * 15:45 12 August 2008

    * NewScientist.com news service

    * David Hambling

 

An airborne laser weapon dubbed the "long-range blowtorch" has the added benefit that the US could convincingly deny any involvement with the destruction it causes, say senior officials of the US Air Force (USAF).

 

The Advanced Tactical Laser (ATL) is to be mounted on a Hercules military transport plane. Boeing announced the first test firing of the laser, from a plane on the ground, earlier this summer.

 

Cynthia Kaiser, chief engineer of the US Air Force Research Laboratory's Directed Energy Directorate, used the phrase "plausible deniability" to describe the weapon's benefits in a briefing (powerpoint format) on laser weapons to the New Mexico Optics Industry Association in June.

Plausibly deniable

 

John Corley, director of USAF's Capabilities Integration Directorate, used the same phrase to describe the weapon's benefits at an Air Armament Symposium in Florida in October 2007 (see page 15, pdf format).

 

As the term suggests, "plausible deniability" is used to describe situations where those responsible for an event could plausibly claim to have had no involvement in it.

 

Corley and Kaiser did not respond to requests from New Scientist to expand on their comments. But John Pike, analyst with defence think-tank Global Security, based in Virginia, says the implications are clear.

 

"The target would never know what hit them," says Pike. "Further, there would be no munition fragments that could be used to identify the source of the strike."

Silent strike

 

A laser beam is silent and invisible. An ATL can deliver the heat of a blowtorch with a range of 20 kilometres, depending on conditions. That range is great enough that the aircraft carrying it might not be seen, especially at night.

 

With no previous examples for comparison, it may be difficult to discern whether damage to a vehicle or person was the result of a laser strike.

 

The 5.5-tonne ATL combines chlorine and hydrogen peroxide molecules to release energy, which is used in turn to stimulate iodine into releasing intense infra-red light.

 

The US uses Hercules aircraft for accurate cannon strikes on moving vehicles. The ATL is touted as bringing a new level of accuracy to such attacks, for example being able to pinpoint a vehicle's tyres to disable it safely.

 

A second, larger version of the laser is also nearing initial testing. The much larger Airborne Laser is intended for missile defence and will be carried by a Boeing 747.

 

Source: http://technology.newscientist.com/channel/tech/dn14520-us-boasts-of-laser-weapons-plausible-deniability.html?feedId=online-news_rss20

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