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Air Conditioning - WHY in winter!?!?!?!?!


Northerngimp
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Seriously, a guy behind us has complained to fuck about being cold and has sat with his coat on for over two weeks, i come in this morning and find that it is now directed right at me. 

 

Its fcking numbing.

 

 

But why have it on in the fucking first place in winter :angry:

 

FFS

 

 

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http://www.hse.gov.uk/contact/faqs/temperature.htm

 

The Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 lay down particular requirements for most aspects of the working environment

 

Regulation 7 of these Regulations deals specifically with the temperature in indoor workplaces and states that:

 

    During working hours, the temperature in all workplaces inside buildings shall be reasonable.

 

However, the application of the regulation depends on the nature of the workplace i.e. a bakery, a cold store, an office, a warehouse.

 

The associated ACOP goes on to explain:

 

    ‘The temperature in workrooms should provide reasonable comfort without the need for special clothing. Where such a temperature is impractical because of hot or cold processes, all reasonable steps should be taken to achieve a temperature which is as close as possible to comfortable. 'Workroom' means a room where people normally work for more than short periods.

 

    The temperature in workrooms should normally be at least 16 degrees Celsius unless much of the work involves severe physical effort in which case the temperature should be at least 13 degrees Celsius. These temperatures may not, however, ensure reasonable comfort, depending on other factors such as air movement and relative humidity.’

 

Where the temperature in a workroom would otherwise be uncomfortably high, for example because of hot processes or the design of the building, all reasonable steps should be taken to achieve a reasonably comfortable temperature, for example by:

 

    * insulating hot plants or pipes;

    * providing air-cooling plant;

    * shading windows;

    * siting workstations away from places subject to radiant heat.

 

Where a reasonably comfortable temperature cannot be achieved throughout a workroom, local cooling should be provided. In extremely hot weather fans and increased ventilation may be used instead of local cooling.

 

Where, despite the provision of local cooling, workers are exposed to temperatures which do not give reasonable comfort, suitable protective clothing and rest facilities should be provided. Where practical there should be systems of work (for example, task rotation) to ensure that the length of time for which individual workers are exposed to uncomfortable temperatures is limited.

References

 

    * L24, Workplace health, safety and welfare, (ISBN 0 7176 0413 6 - available from HSE Books)[1]

    * Thermal comfort microsite

 

 

 

 

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whats really an absolute p!ss take is walking into shops in newcastle during winter its absolutely insane how hot some of these places are. eldon square is like a fookin oven.

 

but using air-con in an office in winter is to circulate and recycle the air so that it does'nt sit and stagnate.

 

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Guest lankybellwipe

Just smash the thing, or set up a board that deflects the cold air at someone else.

 

Its ten foot above me.

 

I'll smash it then!

 

O0

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whats really an absolute p!ss take is walking into shops in newcastle during winter its absolutely insane how hot some of these places are. eldon square is like a fookin oven.

 

Same point I came in the thread to make. When everyone is dressed for freezing temperatures, why the fuck do they make it about thirty degrees?

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