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Assisted Suicide?


Guest toonlass
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Certainly not a black and white issue.  I've no problem with people being allowed to end their own life if that's what they genuinely want but there will be cases where people are making the decision under duress.  To me, that's the big problem.

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Your question is too undefined for me to be able to answer. Specifically, it's answer depends upon the circumstances surrounding the assisted suicide and if you define those circumstances to the level required to make a decision then there is only one answer to be made and that might be either right or wrong, depending upon the circumstances you have described.

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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

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Guest toonlass

Your question is too undefined for me to be able to answer. Specifically, it's answer depends upon the circumstances surrounding the assisted suicide and if you define those circumstances to the level required to make a decision then there is only one answer to be made and that might be either right or wrong, depending upon the circumstances you have described.

 

Pardon?

 

Ok, say someone has a terminal disease/illness. Should they be allowed to end their life at a time of their choice, rather than wait until they die naturally?

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Guest toonlass

I will put my point of view forward. I think someone who believes that their quality of life is such that they would prefer to take their own life, then who is anyone to tell us that it is wrong. If a person who makes a decision, when they are of sound mind, that they wish to decide to die, but they do not have the physical capabilities to commit suicide, then why can they not be assisted to die, without fear that their loved ones will be persecuted?

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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?
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Your question is too undefined for me to be able to answer. Specifically, it's answer depends upon the circumstances surrounding the assisted suicide and if you define those circumstances to the level required to make a decision then there is only one answer to be made and that might be either right or wrong, depending upon the circumstances you have described.

 

Pardon?

 

Ok, say someone has a terminal disease/illness. Should they be allowed to end their life at a time of their choice, rather than wait until they die naturally?

 

See above your post.

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I will put my point of view forward. I think someone who believes that their quality of life is such that they would prefer to take their own life, then who is anyone to tell us that it is wrong. If a person who makes a decision, when they are of sound mind, that they wish to decide to die, but they do not have the physical capabilities to commit suicide, then why can they not be assisted to die, without fear that their loved ones will be persecuted?

 

The issue isn't the people who genuinely want to die.  That's an easy decision.  The problem is that by allowing that across the board then there will be some who are bullied into making a decision by relatives motivated by things like inheritance.  There are some very unscrupulous people out there.

 

As I said, far from a black and white issue.

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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?

 

[Why don't we have a shrugging shoulders smiley?]

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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?

 

[Why don't we have a shrugging shoulders smiley?]

 

:dontknow:

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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?

 

[Why don't we have a shrugging shoulders smiley?]

 

:dontknow:

 

[Why don't we have a that answers my question smiley?]

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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?

 

[Why don't we have a shrugging shoulders smiley?]

 

:dontknow:

 

[Why don't we have a that answers my question smiley?]

 

:dontknow:

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Guest toonlass

Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?

 

[Why don't we have a shrugging shoulders smiley?]

 

:dontknow:

 

[Why don't we have a that answers my question smiley?]

 

:pow:

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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?

 

[Why don't we have a shrugging shoulders smiley?]

it was on radio 5 this week. some laddo trying to get help for his mother and he drew the paralell with suicide. ie the authorities will try to stop someone committing suicide but not if they are killing themselves with the drink.
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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?

 

[Why don't we have a shrugging shoulders smiley?]

 

:dontknow:

 

[Why don't we have a that answers my question smiley?]

 

:pow:

 

[Why don't we have a why don't we stop doing this now smiley?]

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Your question is too undefined for me to be able to answer. Specifically, it's answer depends upon the circumstances surrounding the assisted suicide and if you define those circumstances to the level required to make a decision then there is only one answer to be made and that might be either right or wrong, depending upon the circumstances you have described.

 

Pardon?

 

Ok, say someone has a terminal disease/illness. Should they be allowed to end their life at a time of their choice, rather than wait until they die naturally?

 

It depends. For a start, euthanasia doesn't just affect the rights of the patient... For seconds, it leads to moral and ethical wrongs such as enforced or involuntary euthanasia... For thirds, it undermimes the commitment that doctors make to saving lives.. etc etc etc. But on the contrary, if somebody is clearly mentally competent and under no undue pressure, who are the rest of us to say that they shouldn't have the freedom to die as and when they choose?

 

Basically it's one of those subjects where any kind of judicial precedent is extremely dodgy at best.

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Basically what I'm saying is if it is the person's own decision and they are absolutely certain of it, then I don't want to see their family prosecuted for helping them, ie right. If they have been coerced or otherwise encouraged to do it against their will, then whoever does that should be prosecuted, ie wrong. Hence: it depends, doesn't it.

 

The current situation of de facto decriminalisation unless there are suspicions of foul-play, seems to be sensible to me.

what if the person has decided to drink themselves to death ? should the family be stopped from bringing them cans of spcial brew?

 

[Why don't we have a shrugging shoulders smiley?]

 

:dontknow:

 

[Why don't we have a that answers my question smiley?]

 

:mysterysolved:

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