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Damp?


mattynufc
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Right, I have a moved into a house with my lass which we own.  Moved in about 2 year ago (well she did, then I did recently).

 

Trouble is, the wall below the window is covered in condensation.  It was fine, up until I decorated and now the paint just feels very slimey all the time, we can only think it is the condensation from the shower (downstairs bathroom).  However today I moved the couch to hoover (it doesn;t happen often) and there was a huge puddle of water underneath it.  Had to use 2 towels to soak it all up properly.

 

Any idea what has/is causing it and a cheap way of resolving it?  Baring in mind I am 22 and know little DIY at the minute tearing the wall apart and tanking it myself is probably not an option and will cost at least £500 no doubt from a builder.  Anyone?

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Get some air movement going. Extractor fans etc are a must.

 

Always put the hob extractor on like when we have a shower and keep windows open, though it was working as well but obviously not!

 

Cheers Interpolic.  Will have a look through the thread/at de-humidifiers.

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You say under the window? have you got wet getting in round the frame?

 

Not that I am aware on.  Windowledge dry (little damp like the rest though) so thought if it was coming from there the water would gather on the ledge.  It is an end of terrace is that makes any difference.

 

Them humdifiers inter mentioned seem like they may do the job, if not looks like we won't be having xmas this year!

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You say under the window? have you got wet getting in round the frame?

 

Not that I am aware on.  Windowledge dry (little damp like the rest though) so thought if it was coming from there the water would gather on the ledge.  It is an end of terrace is that makes any difference.

 

Them humdifiers inter mentioned seem like they may do the job, if not looks like we won't be having xmas this year!

 

 

i mean below the frame, in the gap between the sill and the brickwork, if the pointing or frame sealer is cracked, and the drip groove on the underside of the sill is clogged,.... you get wet under the window on the inside.

 

also, once had paint not drying on gable wall, and wet when it rained,. turned out to need re-pointing.

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Right, I have a moved into a house with my lass which we own.  Moved in about 2 year ago (well she did, then I did recently).

 

Trouble is, the wall below the window is covered in condensation.  It was fine, up until I decorated and now the paint just feels very slimey all the time, we can only think it is the condensation from the shower (downstairs bathroom).  However today I moved the couch to hoover (it doesn;t happen often) and there was a huge puddle of water underneath it.  Had to use 2 towels to soak it all up properly.

 

Any idea what has/is causing it and a cheap way of resolving it?  Baring in mind I am 22 and know little DIY at the minute tearing the wall apart and tanking it myself is probably not an option and will cost at least £500 no doubt from a builder.  Anyone?

 

Complicated and expensive solution is required here. I'd find another woman me like.

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We have similar problems.

 

Just moved in an upstairs flat with two mates and in the bathroom in particular I've noticed alot of damp appearing. Some near the bottom of the wall near the toilet and some on the ceiling above the shower. I reckon it's probably a mixture of problems - alot of water vapour or whatever from the bath/shower and maybe the cold on the windows/wall from outside. It also sounds like a de-humidifier may be the thing we need.

 

We rent the flat so not sure if any structural work is required we'd have to pay or if our landlord would have to? Big Harminda might sort it for us.

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We have similar problems.

 

Just moved in an upstairs flat with two mates and in the bathroom in particular I've noticed alot of damp appearing. Some near the bottom of the wall near the toilet and some on the ceiling above the shower. I reckon it's probably a mixture of problems - alot of water vapour or whatever from the bath/shower and maybe the cold on the windows/wall from outside. It also sounds like a de-humidifier may be the thing we need.

 

We rent the flat so not sure if any structural work is required we'd have to pay or if our landlord would have to? Big Harminda might sort it for us.

 

Tell your landlord and then just hope he isn't an arsehole.

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Well, I tried to get a little portable de-humidfier thing to see if that would do out.  Its collected about 2 tbsps of water in 24 hours, so presume its not working as it is meant to :( Guess being a cheap skate is not the way forwards here.

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Well, I tried to get a little portable de-humidfier thing to see if that would do out.  Its collected about 2 tbsps of water in 24 hours, so presume its not working as it is meant to :( Guess being a cheap skate is not the way forwards here.

 

 

how close is your sofa to the wall? how old is your house?

 

Often old house walls need to breathe, and furniture against walls can cause damp.

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We have similar problems.

 

Just moved in an upstairs flat with two mates and in the bathroom in particular I've noticed alot of damp appearing. Some near the bottom of the wall near the toilet and some on the ceiling above the shower. I reckon it's probably a mixture of problems - alot of water vapour or whatever from the bath/shower and maybe the cold on the windows/wall from outside. It also sounds like a de-humidifier may be the thing we need.

 

We rent the flat so not sure if any structural work is required we'd have to pay or if our landlord would have to? Big Harminda might sort it for us.

This will be codensation as damp only rises 1m from ground level just had a full damp proof cause done on my old victorian house went over kill and used seeker on it, its what they put in swimming pools to waterproof them  had to have more airbricks and a new extractor in kithen and bathroom for better ventilation

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We have similar problems.

 

Just moved in an upstairs flat with two mates and in the bathroom in particular I've noticed alot of damp appearing. Some near the bottom of the wall near the toilet and some on the ceiling above the shower. I reckon it's probably a mixture of problems - alot of water vapour or whatever from the bath/shower and maybe the cold on the windows/wall from outside. It also sounds like a de-humidifier may be the thing we need.

 

We rent the flat so not sure if any structural work is required we'd have to pay or if our landlord would have to? Big Harminda might sort it for us.

This will be codensation as damp only rises 1m from ground level just had a full damp proof cause done on my old victorian house went over kill and used seeker on it, its what they put in swimming pools to waterproof them  had to have more airbricks and a new extractor in kithen and bathroom for better ventilation

 

 

penetrating damp can occur at any level, its rising damp you have remedied.

 

edit, tho your right it does sound like condensation in that bathroom.

 

.

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Well, I tried to get a little portable de-humidfier thing to see if that would do out.  Its collected about 2 tbsps of water in 24 hours, so presume its not working as it is meant to :( Guess being a cheap skate is not the way forwards here.

 

 

how close is your sofa to the wall? how old is your house?

 

Often old house walls need to breathe, and furniture against walls can cause damp.

 

It was canny close, about 3 inches.  Moved it a good foot off the wall now like hopefully it will improve - although we have floor length curtains which my lass refuses to take up so that won't be helping.  House is an old terraced house, not sure on the year.

 

Also checked under the window outside, appears someone has replaced quite a few bricks (about 4 rows) under the window itself.  Have a feeling its either been done when the double glazing was fitted and they have missed out some ventilation, or it has been done before by a cowboy perhaps.  (another wall in the house had previously had rising damp, it had been treated but they had tanked the wall right down to the floor causing it to come back.

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Well, I tried to get a little portable de-humidfier thing to see if that would do out.  Its collected about 2 tbsps of water in 24 hours, so presume its not working as it is meant to :( Guess being a cheap skate is not the way forwards here.

 

 

how close is your sofa to the wall? how old is your house?

 

Often old house walls need to breathe, and furniture against walls can cause damp.

 

It was canny close, about 3 inches.  Moved it a good foot off the wall now like hopefully it will improve - although we have floor length curtains which my lass refuses to take up so that won't be helping.  House is an old terraced house, not sure on the year.

 

Also checked under the window outside, appears someone has replaced quite a few bricks (about 4 rows) under the window itself.  Have a feeling its either been done when the double glazing was fitted and they have missed out some ventilation, or it has been done before by a cowboy perhaps.  (another wall in the house had previously had rising damp, it had been treated but they had tanked the wall right down to the floor causing it to come back.

 

 

sounds like you've got a few possible causes, and its a case of elimination mate.

start with the obvious and easy ones like the furniture off the wall, and the gap filler/ pointing around and bellow the frame. Check the damp proof course,.cant remember if you said it was ground floor.

 

other causes- you may have the cavity bridged, or wall ties put in wrong, if someone has rebuilt the wall.

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Well, I tried to get a little portable de-humidfier thing to see if that would do out.  Its collected about 2 tbsps of water in 24 hours, so presume its not working as it is meant to :( Guess being a cheap skate is not the way forwards here.

 

 

how close is your sofa to the wall? how old is your house?

 

Often old house walls need to breathe, and furniture against walls can cause damp.

 

It was canny close, about 3 inches.  Moved it a good foot off the wall now like hopefully it will improve - although we have floor length curtains which my lass refuses to take up so that won't be helping.  House is an old terraced house, not sure on the year.

 

Also checked under the window outside, appears someone has replaced quite a few bricks (about 4 rows) under the window itself.  Have a feeling its either been done when the double glazing was fitted and they have missed out some ventilation, or it has been done before by a cowboy perhaps.  (another wall in the house had previously had rising damp, it had been treated but they had tanked the wall right down to the floor causing it to come back.

 

 

sounds like you've got a few possible causes, and its a case of elimination mate.

start with the obvious and easy ones like the furniture off the wall, and the gap filler/ pointing around and bellow the frame. Check the damp proof course,.cant remember if you said it was ground floor.

 

other causes- you may have the cavity bridged, or wall ties put in wrong, if someone has rebuilt the wall.

 

When you mention gap filler below the frame - what exactly do you mean?  Do you mean check to see if there is a gap between brick work and the window cill? (presume there shouldnt be)

 

Sorry if questions sound stupid, as I said I am 22 and have grew up using computer and being exposed to minimal DIY - youth of today eh?

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Well, I tried to get a little portable de-humidfier thing to see if that would do out.  Its collected about 2 tbsps of water in 24 hours, so presume its not working as it is meant to :( Guess being a cheap skate is not the way forwards here.

 

 

how close is your sofa to the wall? how old is your house?

 

Often old house walls need to breathe, and furniture against walls can cause damp.

 

It was canny close, about 3 inches.  Moved it a good foot off the wall now like hopefully it will improve - although we have floor length curtains which my lass refuses to take up so that won't be helping.  House is an old terraced house, not sure on the year.

 

Also checked under the window outside, appears someone has replaced quite a few bricks (about 4 rows) under the window itself.  Have a feeling its either been done when the double glazing was fitted and they have missed out some ventilation, or it has been done before by a cowboy perhaps.  (another wall in the house had previously had rising damp, it had been treated but they had tanked the wall right down to the floor causing it to come back.

 

 

sounds like you've got a few possible causes, and its a case of elimination mate.

start with the obvious and easy ones like the furniture off the wall, and the gap filler/ pointing around and bellow the frame. Check the damp proof course,.cant remember if you said it was ground floor.

 

other causes- you may have the cavity bridged, or wall ties put in wrong, if someone has rebuilt the wall.

 

When you mention gap filler below the frame - what exactly do you mean?  Do you mean check to see if there is a gap between brick work and the window cill? (presume there shouldnt be)

 

Sorry if questions sound stupid, as I said I am 22 and have grew up using computer and being exposed to minimal DIY - youth of today eh?

 

i think i mentioned it earlier, its the sealer between the frame, and the wall, under the cill, ive seen/ had damp via that before. but its usually just a bit on the inside under the window, and yeah there shouldnt be a gap.

 

dont worry about questions, i bought my first place at 26 and probably had the older joiners at work round the twist as i quizzed them about every job.

 

 

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Well, I tried to get a little portable de-humidfier thing to see if that would do out.  Its collected about 2 tbsps of water in 24 hours, so presume its not working as it is meant to :( Guess being a cheap skate is not the way forwards here.

 

 

how close is your sofa to the wall? how old is your house?

 

Often old house walls need to breathe, and furniture against walls can cause damp.

 

It was canny close, about 3 inches.  Moved it a good foot off the wall now like hopefully it will improve - although we have floor length curtains which my lass refuses to take up so that won't be helping.  House is an old terraced house, not sure on the year.

 

Also checked under the window outside, appears someone has replaced quite a few bricks (about 4 rows) under the window itself.  Have a feeling its either been done when the double glazing was fitted and they have missed out some ventilation, or it has been done before by a cowboy perhaps.  (another wall in the house had previously had rising damp, it had been treated but they had tanked the wall right down to the floor causing it to come back.

 

 

sounds like you've got a few possible causes, and its a case of elimination mate.

start with the obvious and easy ones like the furniture off the wall, and the gap filler/ pointing around and bellow the frame. Check the damp proof course,.cant remember if you said it was ground floor.

 

other causes- you may have the cavity bridged, or wall ties put in wrong, if someone has rebuilt the wall.

 

When you mention gap filler below the frame - what exactly do you mean?  Do you mean check to see if there is a gap between brick work and the window cill? (presume there shouldnt be)

 

Sorry if questions sound stupid, as I said I am 22 and have grew up using computer and being exposed to minimal DIY - youth of today eh?

 

i think i mentioned it earlier, its the sealer between the frame, and the wall, under the cill, ive seen/ had damp via that before. but its usually just a bit on the inside under the window, and yeah there shouldnt be a gap.

 

dont worry about questions, i bought my first place at 26 and probably had the older joiners at work round the twist as i quizzed them about every job.

 

 

 

No bother, I see what you mean now.  The inside in a wood window ledge with no obvious rot or gaps anywhere.  Checked outside and all appears fine.  There are two little holes at the bottom of the wall where the wall meets the path, about 3 inches in length and 1/2inch thick but they appear to be blocked with soil. No idea what they are there for.

 

Not sure if it is psychological but the wall feels a little less slimey but that is possibly as I wiped it over with a towel a couple days ago.  Guess its a waiting game regarding moving the couch.  Quite a bit of condensation on the window still like.

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