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Iran and Islamist Terrorism


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[1] Iran is seeking to influence Al Qaeda in naming its no.3 by promoting a pro-Iranian "activist" according to intelligence obtained by the Telegraph.

 

[2] 720 Somali Islamist fighters went to Lebanon to fight Israel alongside Hezbollah, who in return arranged for support to be given by Iran and Syria which included "shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missiles, grenade launchers, machine guns, ammunition" and Syria also "hosted about 200 Islamist fighters for training in guerrilla warfare, the report says."  The report was done by the UN.

 

 

 

 

[1] Iran forging alliance with Al-Qaeda?

By Jeffrey Imm

 

 

The Daily Telegraph reports today that Iran is seeking to wield influence within Al-Qaeda to help name its number three individual in the Al-Qaeda organization. If accurate, the report states that Ahmadinejad is trying to persuade Al-Qaeda to promote a pro-Iranian activist (Saif Al-Adel) to a senior position within its leadership.

 

For the past three years, U.S. intelligence officials have said a shadowy group called the "al Quds force"-- the Jerusalem force -- part of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard organization, may be sheltering some al Qaeda leaders, including its military commander, Saif Al-Adel, and Saad Bin Laden, son of the al Qaeda leader.

 

It is now reported that Iran is seeking Saif Al-Adel to fill the number three position of the Al-Qaeda organization. It is also reported that is believed that Osama Bin Laden health problems may be causing Iran's push to have Saif Al-Adel in that role to complement Zawahiri. According to reports from Western intelligence agencies, Iran is training senior Al-Qaeda operatives in Teheran to take over the organisation when bin Laden is no longer leader. For some time, military officials have claimed that Iran is providing Iraqi terrorists with arms.

 

Background on Saif Al-Adel: "Al-Adel, 46, a former colonel in Egypt's special forces who joined al-Qa'eda after fighting with the Mujahideen against Soviet forces in Afghanistan in the 1980s, was named in the FBI's list of 22 most wanted terrorists that was issued after the September 11 attacks. He is also alleged to have been involved in the deaths of 18 US soldiers in Somalia in 1993 and the truck bomb attacks on the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania in 1998. Until 2003, al-Adel acted as bin Laden's security chief and since his arrival in Iran he is understood to have struck up a close personal relationship with several prominent Revolutionary Guards commanders."

 

MEMRI reports that, in October 2006, Jihadist websites posted top secret Iranian document showing that prior to 9/11 indicated Iran's willingness to further Al-Qaeda's "future plans", where Khamenei "has emphasized that 'the battle against the global arrogance headed by the U.S. and Israel is an integral part of our Islamic government, and constitutes its primary goal". 9/11 Commission members have previously reported to press that there was evidence suggesting that the 9/11 hijackers had previously passed through Iran.

 

Reports in August 2006 stated that Saad Bin Laden was to support Hezbollah fighting.

 

 

Sources: Iran plotting to groom bin Laden's successor - Daily Telegraph

Iran 'is training the next al-Qa'eda leaders' - Daily Telegraph

Iraqi terrorists 'are being supplied with arms smuggled from Iran' - Daily Telegraph

Iran 'the victor in war on terror' - Daily Telegraph

MEMRI: Sunni Islamists Websites in Iraq Claim Iranian Top-Secret Document Reveals Iran/Al-Qaeda Contacts Months Before 9/11

Iran frees bin Laden son: newspaper - Iran frees bin Laden son-German newspaper - Saad bin Laden released on July 28 for "building Islamist terror cells and preparing them to fight together with Hizbollah" - August 2006

Die Welt: Bin Laden's son sent to operate against Israel - August 2006

9/11 Commission Finds Ties Between al-Qaeda and Iran - Time

Iran: Al Qaeda suspects sent home - U.S. believes bin Laden spokesman in Iran, including its military commander, Saif al-Adel, and Saad bin Laden, son of the al Qaeda leader - October 2003 - CNN

Iran admits holding al Qaeda operatives - May 2003 - CNN

 

http://counterterrorismblog.org/2006/11/iran_forging_alliance_with_alq_1.php

 

 

[2] Tuesday November 14, 2006

What is Iran Up To?

 

As my colleague Jeffrey Imm points out on the Counterterrorism Blog, there are reports of Iran’s attempt to gain influence in the traditional al Qaeda structure. This an interesting development, especially when coupled with another, equally ominous and interesting development: Iran’s likely involvement with the Islamic Court Union in Somalia.

 

This is a stark departure across Sunni-Shi’ite differences, and one that, if true, could portend a serious realignment within the different Islamist camps. Such a cross-pollination is also significant given the recent and ongoing Sunni-Shi’ite massacres, based solely on religion, taking place in Iraq.

 

A soon-to-be published United Nations panel of experts outlined Iran’s contacts in Somalia, including the taking of several hundred Somali fighters to Lebanon to fight with Hezbollah.

 

In my opinion, one of the few things the UN does consistently well is their Panel of Experts reports. They put people on the ground, gain access and consistently produce reports that are widely ignored by the General Secretariat. Here is what they found:

 

The report said about 720 Somali Islamist fighters with combat experience—selected by Afghanistan-trained hardline Islamist commander Adan Hashi Farah “Ayro”—went to Lebanon to fight Israel along Hezbollah in mid-July.

 

The fighters were paid $2,000 and as much as $30,000, to be given to their families, if they were killed, the report says.

 

At least 100 Somali fighters returned, along with five Hezbollah members, while an unknown number stayed in Lebanon for advanced military training, it states.

 

“In exchange for the contribution of the Somali military force, Hezbollah arranged for additional support to be given … by the governments of the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Syrian Arab Republic, which was subsequently provided,” it says.

 

This is significant in its scope. It is also extremely interesting, because in both the cases the alliances cross the traditional Shi’ite-Sunni divide in ways that are unusual, if not unique. While bin Laden has had documented contacts with Hezbollah (particularly Imad Mugniyah, the mastermind behind Hezbollah’s truck bombing operations) there has been little indication of further alliances.

 

As Jeffrey Imm points out, al Qaeda has a history in Iran. Bin Laden’s son is there, one of his wives at least transited through there during the exodus from Afghanistan, and several other senior leaders appear to be held in some form of moderate house arrest, unable to travel freely but certainly not in prison.

 

It will be interesting to see if this is a truely significant realignment or tactical moves that bring short term benefit to both sides but does not fundamentally change the current working relationship.

 

posted by Douglas Farah

 

http://www.douglasfarah.com/

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Iran is the most dangerous country in the world in my opinion. A hard-line fascist state who wants to Islamicise the world, openly calls for the destruction of another UN member state (Israel), denies the Holocaust, funds Hamas and Islamic Jihad and is openly goading the west with its nuclear programme.

 

Make no mistake, Armadinijhad is fantical maniac who is spoiling for a war. 

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isn't it strange that all these countries that are now troblesome are countries we fucked up in the past......anyway ,can't go back and change things so if the US can sort out iran without getting us all killed we can then start on a plan to curb the US.

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the problem that Iran has it that its not Arab & they always promote radical Shia Islam

 

For most Arabs these are two major problems - they don't trust them either and suspect their meddling in the Gulf region

 

The problem is that the West has made such a ball sup in Iraq and over Palestine that the Iranians start to look a bit more attractive

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Gawd hlep us!!!

 

Shia and Sunni are two different flavours of Islam - which is a religion - think Orthodox Russian and Pentecostal American

 

Iranians always claim to be "persians" - a racial term and certainly NOT Arabs - who they see as desert living, camel humping scum whereas they have thousands of years of civilisation etc etc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Aye, Rob is spot on, although the differences in Islamic cultures is lost on many in the west even though there is a vast difference between say Persians/Iranians/Afghans for example (not that I claim to be an expert). Even an intelligent person like Chez is unaware of the distinction (not a dig by the way).

The schism between Shia and Sunni dates back to very soon after the death of Mohammed iirc.

As an aside, the first monotheistic religion may have been Zoroastrianism (sp?) which started in Persia and could be older than Judaism. The 3 Wise Men are often thought to have been Zoroastrian Holy men.

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Aye, Rob is spot on, although the differences in Islamic cultures is lost on many in the west even though there is a vast difference between say Persians/Iranians/Afghans for example (not that I claim to be an expert). Even an intelligent person like Chez is unaware of the distinction (not a dig by the way).

The schism between Shia and Sunni dates back to very soon after the death of Mohammed iirc.

As an aside, the first monotheistic religion may have been Zoroastrianism (sp?) which started in Persia and could be older than Judaism. The 3 Wise Men are often thought to have been Zoroastrian Holy men.

 

I was just pointing out that Shias can also be Arabs, which they can be.

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Culturally it isn't 'Arabic' though. Arabs are a small ethnic minority there I think.

 

In the Shia community...

 

Am no expert in this, which was why i asked in the first place.

I would have to look it up but I think the majority (over 3/4) of the whole population are Shia and the majority of the population as a whole is Persian with other ethic groups like Kurds forming a greater number of the population than Arabs who are way down the list. I'm taking this from one of those 'Holidays in the Axis of Evil' programmes I saw a while back. I wouldn't know if most of the Arabs there are Sunni/Shia though.

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Culturally it isn't 'Arabic' though. Arabs are a small ethnic minority there I think.

 

In the Shia community...

 

Am no expert in this, which was why i asked in the first place.

I would have to look it up but I think the majority (over 3/4) of the whole population are Shia and the majority of the population as a whole is Persian with other ethic groups like Kurds forming a greater number of the population than Arabs who are way down the list. I'm taking this from one of those 'Holidays in the Axis of Evil' programmes I saw a while back. I wouldn't know if most of the Arabs there are Sunni/Shia though.

 

I do know the Iran / Iraq war was over contested Arab land which fell under Iranian control. The Arabs were not happy over the slice up of land (British fault + others) so i always assumed there were Arabs in Iran as the oil rich provence was theirs in the first place.

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Doesn't Iraq have a majority Shia population btw? Are they Arabs though? Fuck, I'm confusing myself here  :lol:

Rob? Help!

 

Hes knocking up a Venn diagram on his CAD machine as we speak... :lol:

:lol: Aye. Although we bicker a lot, I love Rob's posts in the main. Both here and Toontastic would be worse off without his pearls of wisdom.

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Yes the majority of Iraqis are Shia who live mainly in the South.

But are they Arabs or Persians  blueconfused.gif

 

Yes they are Arabs ethnically the ones in Iraq are,  even though the majority Iranians are Shia they are ethnically Persians it's the same as in Afghanistan and Pakistan they not Arabs ethnically even though their Religion is Shia.

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Doesn't Iraq have a majority Shia population btw? Are they Arabs though? Fuck, I'm confusing myself here  :lol:

Rob? Help!

 

In general Iraq is Arab with a Kurdish minority in the N

 

A significant minority of the population are Shia - in fact most of the main Shia shrines are in Iraq - the SHia re in the south around basra and partyly in teh north .  The Sunni are in teh centre and west of Iraq

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Yes the majority of Iraqis are Shia who live mainly in the South.

But are they Arabs or Persians  blueconfused.gif

 

Yes they are Arabs ethnically the ones in Iraq are,  even though the majority Iranians are Shia they are ethnically Persians it's the same as in Afghanistan and Pakistan they not Arabs ethnically even though their Religion is Shia.

The majority of Afghans and Pakistanis are Sunnis are they not? I think that's what you meant though in any case.

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Most of Islam is Sunni - in say India, Malaysia and Indonesia they are almost 100% Sunni

 

Pakistan is largely Sunni

 

Shia are only in large numbers in Iran and Iraq

 

The main practical difference is that the Sunni believe you speak directly to God without any intermediary - the Shia tend to take a lead from their Ayatollahs etc

 

race doesn't enter into it

 

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