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Asylum seekers and their cushy life!


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Sounds idyllic.

 

Russian family 'jumped to deaths' from Glasgow flats

 

 

Three people who plunged to their deaths from a multi-storey flat in Glasgow were a Russian family seeking asylum in the UK, the BBC understands.

 

The father, mother and son had been granted asylum in Canada but left after a dispute with the authorities there.

 

Their application to remain in the UK had recently been refused but they had not been issued with a removal order.

 

The apparent triple suicide happened on Sunday at the Red Road flats complex in the Springburn area of the city.

 

The BBC understands the family first arrived in the UK in 2007.

 

According to a source familiar with the case, the family had been told that they had to leave their flat in Springburn after their application to stay was refused.

 

No removal order had been issued, however, and they were advised to seek help from the Scottish Refugee Council to find alternative accommodation.

 

The family are believed to have jumped to their deaths shortly before 0845 GMT on Sunday.

 

The bodies were discovered by the concierge at the tower block after they had fallen from the 15th floor.

 

Police said there did not appear to be any suspicious circumstances.

 

Many of the flats are unoccupied as the local housing agency is moving residents to new accommodation.

 

Glasgow Housing Association said the block at 63 Petershill Drive is currently let to the YMCA.

 

BBC News Scotland correspondent Lorna Gordon said: "Several of the blocks in this area are let out to the YMCA who house asylum seekers and refugees seeking leave to remain.

 

"These blocks are iconic in the Glasgow skyline, there is a large police presence in the area, they are canvassing people who live here to try to get more information as to the identities of the individuals."

 

It is understood the block involved holds a mixture of asylum seekers, refugees and other residents, but has partly been cleared in preparation for a demolition programme.

 

One resident in the block where the incident occurred said those involved had moved into the flats about two months ago.

 

Glasgow Springburn MSP Paul Martin said: "This is a terrible tragedy and the thoughts of myself and the community are with the families of those who died in this tragic event."

 

Concern about the deaths was also expressed by Positive Action in Housing, a Scottish charity which supports and campaigns for refugees and asylum seekers in the local communities.

 

Its director, Robina Qureshi, said: "We are concerned about who these people are and whether they were claiming asylum in this country, whether they had recently been given a negative decision by the UK Borders Agency, and whether they were our service users or volunteers."

 

All eight tower blocks in the Red Road complex, which are up to 30 storeys high, are due to be demolished in a phased programme which will start in the spring.

 

They were the tallest tower blocks in Europe at the time they were built in the 1960s.

Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/glasgow_and_west/8554849.stm

 

 

'I fear every knock on my door'

 

By Joanne Macaulay

BBC Scotland news website

 

 

Ledia Tewelde sobs as she arrives at the spot where three people apparently jumped from the 15th floor of a block of flats in Glasgow.

 

She understands how they may have felt, because last year she jumped out of a flat window as the pressure of being an asylum seeker became too much for her.

 

Ledia is 22 and from Eritrea - the country she fled because of fear of religious persecution.

 

She has been in Glasgow for four years, but she still does not know whether or not she can stay, and she fears any knock at the door.

 

"We're coming to this country for safety but there's no safety here - I'm scared all the time."

 

Ledia jumped out of the window when she heard a knock at the door one night.

 

She feared it was perhaps the Home Office coming to deport her, or just someone else with a grudge against asylum seekers.

 

So she jumped, breaking both legs and fracturing her back.

 

'Bad situation'

 

Scotland has not turned out to be the safe haven she had hoped for, but she said she does not want to go back to Eritrea.

 

"It's a very bad situation in my country.

 

"I am protestant and the government would put me in jail," she said.

 

For many of the asylum seekers living in the Red Road flats it is the uncertainty which is stressful.

 

 

They do not know whether or not they will have to return to the country they left, and as they await decisions they are unable to work, often living on food vouchers.

 

A Liberian woman cuddles her two-year-old son as she pauses to look at the candles and signs which have been placed where the three people died.

 

"I'm scared they might come to get me," she said in reference to the Home Office.

 

Tina has been here for two-and-a-half years, having fled Liberia because her family wanted to perform a circumcision on her.

 

Her application for asylum has been refused, and she says life is very difficult.

 

She said: "The Home Office don't even look at people's cases any more, they just refuse."

 

She dreads having to return to Liberia: "Since I've disobeyed my parents there's no home for me.

 

"The police told me 'your father is right, this is our culture'."

 

Tina is now living on food vouchers, which leaves no money for clothes or other extras.

 

"I will face what I have to," she said.

 

But she added: "If I have to go home I will have my son adopted here."

Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/8555763.stm

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How come they ended up in Scotland? How many countries did they pass to get there?

so countries ability to give refuge ought to be based on geogoraphy ?

 

I don't begrudge them living here, just curious.

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How come they ended up in Scotland? How many countries did they pass to get there?

so countries ability to give refuge ought to be based on geogoraphy ?

 

I don't begrudge them living here, just curious.

 

They do by international law have to take refuge in the first safe country they come across. Not that I think that its relevant to this case, but geogegraphy does sort of count.

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How come they ended up in Scotland? How many countries did they pass to get there?

so countries ability to give refuge ought to be based on geogoraphy ?

 

I don't begrudge them living here, just curious.

 

They do by international law have to take refuge in the first safe country they come across. Not that I think that its relevant to this case, but geogegraphy does sort of count.

thats why i menationed ability to give refuge.
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Guest toonlass

They could probably spell Geography better than at least two posters in this thread, bloody tragedy that they died.

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They could probably spell Geography better than at least two posters in this thread, bloody tragedy that they died.

could they type it better whilst working on a double for the next day,watching the tele and eating with a broken hand ?
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Guest toonlass

They could probably spell Geography better than at least two posters in this thread, bloody tragedy that they died.

could they type it better whilst working on a double for the next day,watching the tele and eating with a broken hand ?

 

Yes, yes they could!

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They could probably spell Geography better than at least two posters in this thread, bloody tragedy that they died.

could they type it better whilst working on a double for the next day,watching the tele and eating with a broken hand ?

 

Yes, yes they could!

aye, i suppose they probably could.
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so they had been accepted in canada but came here instead  :facepalm:

 

I'd like to know what issues they had with authorities in canada.

and after they had been granted asylum there i'm quite pleased they were rejected here. If you are claiming asylum in a different country then you dont get to pick and chose, you should be grateful that somewhere has accepted you

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I tend to agree, I've nothing against genuine asylum seekers, but passing through (on the way from Africa) Spain, France, Italy, Luxembourg, German etc and always landing here.

It wouldn't be anything to do with our generous welfare system, would it? Just a thought. I live in North London and the abuse of the Asylum/Welfare system particularly by African Muslims is happening on an industrial scale.

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Has anyone actually followed up on this story before coming out with how racist and horrible we all supposedly are?

 

Turns out they were a bunch of loonies with paranoid delusions.

 

Kneejerk liberal guilt.

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Has anyone actually followed up on this story before coming out with how racist and horrible we all supposedly are?

 

Turns out they were a bunch of loonies with paranoid delusions.

 

Kneejerk liberal guilt.

 

And the second article?

 

Also, I see people who've been granted asylum every day at work, so I actually know what I'm talking about from real-life experience. How many of the people spouting bullshit in this thread have actually even met someone who's come here as an asylum seeker? My guess is none. So if we're going to get into a who-knows-more-about-this debate, you're going to lose. I posted the articles to make a point as people seem more willing to believe stuff if they've read or seen it in the media rather than if people talk about their own experience. The point was that it's nothing like the cake-walk that most people seem to think it is being an asylum seeker and if these people had mental issues then it adds to my point rather than diminishes it, as people with known mental health issues should have been taken care of even better than those without. It's a fucking disgrace that a family who've come here to escape persecution in their own country should be driven to suicide due to the way they've been treated. I'm not having a go at you specifically mate, but I find that the people who come out with anti-asylum-seeker stuff know jack-shit about the subject.

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Guest Chris P

They were Russian. What persecution were they running from in Russia, unless of course they were Chechen.

 

Sorry but the whole thing stinks of something dodgy. Asylums seekers in family suicide? .The Glasgow police complictly looking the other way.

 

Dodgyness of the highest calibre

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They were Russian. What persecution were they running from in Russia, unless of course they were Chechen.

 

Sorry but the whole thing stinks of something dodgy. Asylums seekers in family suicide? .The Glasgow police complictly looking the other way.

 

Dodgyness of the highest calibre

 

My thoughts exactly mate. Sounds like an episode of Spooks...and there's a reason why, tbh.

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They were Russian. What persecution were they running from in Russia, unless of course they were Chechen.

 

Sorry but the whole thing stinks of something dodgy. Asylums seekers in family suicide? .The Glasgow police complictly looking the other way.

 

Dodgyness of the highest calibre

 

It doesn't have to be government persecution for someone to claim asylum though remember, they could have fallen foul of the Mafia, or whatever, there's a lot of that kind of shit going on over there remember. You're right though, the whole thing seems a bit "unusual" and it was declared to be suicide pretty quickly.

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