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Guest hindu times
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Guest hindu times

I'm thinking about getting myself set up at home to record demos of songs. Ideally I'd like the setup to be quite expandable if I wanted to record more advanced things and larger projects.  Would anyone have any recommendations of what I would need (in terms of computer, ram, software and hardware)?

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Guest firetotheworks

Laptop so you can record elsewhere

Get a decent external hard drive. Edirols are my recommendation.

Plently of USB and Firewire ports

Worry more about ram more than processors.

Install software, wav files, and VSTs to seperate hard drives (it keeps things running smoothly)

Get either Cubase with a good PC setup, or ProTools with the MBox

Reason 4

Keep it cheap: More freely available software is available for PCs than Macs. If you have the money, get a mac.

 

My Laptop is pretty good in terms of bang for your buck. I got it in 2008 though, so there might be better now, and you'll need more ram to make it worth your while.

HP Compaq 6710b

 

 

EDIT: Oh aye, and some stereo monitors. KRKs are class for the price.

Microphones: Im at pains to say it, but an SM57 is pretty much a must have for amp/snare recording considering its price.

 

PM Weezertron, he'll know better than me.

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Guest Haris Vuckic

Boss br600.

 

Generally comes with a microphone and everything you need to get started.

 

Piece of piss for demos and that and can also sound really good

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As far as interfaces go I'd go with M-audio. For the simple reason it'll work with all DAWS (logic, Pro tools, Cubase, Ableton etc) giving you the most choice. What model depends on how many inputs you'll need.

 

8 inputs - Recording bands live in a room, extensive microphone set ups on drums (usually metal and heavy rock).

 

4 inputs - You could get by with this for mulitracking. Microphone techniques would be quite simple and more realistic/natural (not metal).

 

2 inputs - You in your bedroom programming drums and adding some guitars or whatever.

 

 

Any budding engineer should have atleast 1 dynamic microphone (sm57/58), a large diaphragm condenser (any cheap rode, SE Electronics  etc) and a stereo pair of small diaphragm condensers (rode, mxl,  etc). You can do pretty much anything with that.

 

I think the most important advice I could give anyone is buy second hand. I've spent thousands on brand new gear that turned out to be junk (shite like pod pros and focusrite preamps). Waste of money.  Also, buy this book http://www.mixingwithyourmind.com/ (or download it via one of those naughty sites) and visit http://recforums.prosoundweb.com/ where world class engineers share their secrets.

 

I could talk all day on this subject but I'd bore the tits off you.

 

 

 

 

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If it's just demos then you don't need much. Get yourself an interface like weezer is saying, any pc really will run a session with only a good few tracks on it. Get a shure sm57 and a large condenser mic. Record in the room that sounds best to you in your house and there are many things you can do do either brighten up or dampen the sound depending on what your after. In terms of being expandable if you get an interface with adat(digital) inputs on it you can then add 8 pre's per adat at a later date if need be. Not sure what focusrite pre's you have used weezer but they have made some of the most respected in the industry and you will find them in a hell of a lot of studios the world over.

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If it's just demos then you don't need much. Get yourself an interface like weezer is saying, any pc really will run a session with only a good few tracks on it. Get a shure sm57 and a large condenser mic. Record in the room that sounds best to you in your house and there are many things you can do do either brighten up or dampen the sound depending on what your after. In terms of being expandable if you get an interface with adat(digital) inputs on it you can then add 8 pre's per adat at a later date if need be. Not sure what focusrite pre's you have used weezer but they have made some of the most respected in the industry and you will find them in a hell of a lot of studios the world over.

 

True that. But on a low budget they sell alot of shite, well in my experience anyway. I had the voicemaster pro which was packed with useless gimics and was bland as owt. Should have shelled out for the API I've always wanted.

 

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In terms of the computer itself, I have a 5 year old iMac which has 2gb ram and a 2ghz processor. Will that run something like pro tools or logic comfortably with say upwards of 25 tracks simulteneously?

 

Yeah no bother. I'd recommend a 7200rpm hard drive though. Once you start using loads of plugins you eat up processing power but I doubt you would need to use that many to notice a difference.

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Depends what kind of stuff you're planning to do.

 

Pro tools is top dog for audio editing. So if you're just recording real instruments and bands then I'd go here. A lot of people liken it's workflow to a tape machine.

 

Logic is a better sequencer. So if you wanna use you're computer as a song writing tool then Logic tips it because of its built in instruments and generally handles midi better.

 

 

They're both amazing when you consider what you have at your fingers. I'd say just choose one and run with it. I use both for different tasks but either can do anything you'd want it to. Once you learn one, you'll be able to use other programs no bother.

 

 

 

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Weezer is exactly right re ptools and logic, I use ptools everyday at work and once you really master it then its incredibly quick and easy to use. I am getting a macbook pro for my home studio tho and plan to get logic so I can use my mackie hardware with it. Will no doubt continue with ptools for editing and mixing tho

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Guest alijmitchell

Just started home production, using Logic as a song writing tool along with a Microkorg USB midi controller. Pretty simple really, also just got given a load of plugins form waves, mate managed to get a torrent last week so that's about 7000 quid wirth of plugins! Using Ableton to DJ with as it is really versatile live and allows me to warp rock and indie tracks and mix them up with some techno and house tracks. Got a novation nio interface, which handles djing well.

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Guest alijmitchell

Okay, so I'm looking at new Macs... can't figure out if I'm going to go for an iMac or Macbook Pro. I assume all the current Macbook Pro's will cope easily with what I'm looking to do?

 

Also, I'm looking into using it for recording some gigs. In terms of additional equipment, what else would I need?

 

Got a Macbook Pro because it turned out to be only about 90 quid more expensive with my GFs student discount. I don't think there is much difference (if any) in terms of processors, but it does have a firewire port, which if you're using a firewire interface for recording etc. will be able to handle more data, and faster than standard USB 2.0.

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Guest alijmitchell

Okay, so I'm looking at new Macs... can't figure out if I'm going to go for an iMac or Macbook Pro. I assume all the current Macbook Pro's will cope easily with what I'm looking to do?

 

Also, I'm looking into using it for recording some gigs. In terms of additional equipment, what else would I need?

 

Got a Macbook Pro because it turned out to be only about 90 quid more expensive with my GFs student discount. I don't think there is much difference (if any) in terms of processors, but it does have a firewire port, which if you're using a firewire interface for recording etc. will be able to handle more data, and faster than standard USB 2.0.

 

Cool. In terms of the student discount, how much did you end up getting off the price? I'm thinking about getting my friend to come to the shop with me with his student Id but would it cause any conflict if the machine is registered to me?

 

Not sure about registration, my is in my GFs name, but I think the registration bit only happens when you set the computer and twin it with an apple account, which means you can put your own deets in. Not sure as I wasn't therre when it was registered. Going to be an issue if we split up like. Still the discount was worth it, I think its 13.5% disc so brints MB pro down to around 800 and something rather than £999. Got 3 year applecare for £49 instead of £200 too which is definitely worth getting if you can squeeze out the money. Best thing I did buying a Mac, way more stable for handling DAWs, especially if they're not paid for (if you know what I mean).

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I recently bought an Maudio profire 2626 for doing drums and that - http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/en/75484 . For £360 it can't be beat. Piss easy to use too.

 

Compare to one of my other interfaces, an Apogee duet, which has 2 inputs and no midi which set me back 300 spackeroons. But that's because its an Apogee and it sounds sweet as.

 

But yeah, pretty stellar value with the 2626. I love it.

 

 

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Guest firetotheworks

So what are peoples opinions on what is the most important thing after instruments and microphones to get everything sounding immense?

 

Pre-amps, interfaces/sound cards, compressors, EQs, mixing desks?

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So what are peoples opinions on what is the most important thing after instruments and microphones to get everything sounding immense?

 

Pre-amps, interfaces/sound cards, compressors, EQs, mixing desks?

 

Ears!

 

:facepalm:

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Other than ears and experience, I would go with acoustics to be honest. At both the recording and mixing stage - record in a nice/treated room and mix it in a treated room.

 

Going to start making a few more bass traps this summer. The ones I made last year have worked a treat. Maybe some baffles/barriers too for the practice room to get that dry drum sound I love.

 

 

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Speaking of acoustics has anyone use one of these reflection filter jobbies?

 

http://www.dv247.com/assets/products/68611_p.jpg

 

Aye, dont buy it. Especially the ones that just use foam, like the one in the pic you posted.

 

I've used the SE Reflection filter which did what it was meant to (kept it dry) but they can sometimes make your vocals sound weird (comb filtering).

 

They're way too expensive for what they are.

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