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Is the Pope Catholic?


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Well, is he?   

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  1. 1. Well, is he?

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Nope he's a Nazi

 

I'm afraid we've already had that poll, it was posted by Martin Luther on 31 October 1517

 

Just realised. The last Pope was a "Pole". Pole Pope. Pope Poll...see what I've done there? :)

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Nope he's a Nazi

 

I'm afraid we've already had that poll, it was posted by Martin Luther on 31 October 1517

 

Just realised. The last Pope was a "Pole". Pole Pope. Pope Poll...see what I've done there? :)

 

I did, and thank you for explaining it in some detail, I'd never have got it otherwise  bluewink.gif

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Nope he's a Nazi

 

I'm afraid we've already had that poll, it was posted by Martin Luther on 31 October 1517

 

Just realised. The last Pope was a "Pole". Pole Pope. Pope Poll...see what I've done there? :)

 

I did, and thank you for explaining it in some detail, I'd never have got it otherwise bluewink.gif

 

I know. You're such a divvy. bluebigrazz.gif

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Never mind the original question - clearly the Pope's off to stir up a bit of trouble in the land of the mental Muslims...so is he just mental or what?  blueeek.gif

 

20,000 Muslims protest at Pope's Turkey visit

 

MORE than 20,000 Muslims in Istanbul yesterday held the biggest protest so far against Pope Benedict's controversial visit to Turkey this week.

 

The Pope, who is due to begin his first official visit to a Muslim country tomorrow, angered many Muslims in September with a speech they took as an insult to their religion.

 

Youths wearing headbands with Islamic slogans, beating drums and waving Turkish flags chanted "Allahu Akbar" (God is greatest) and "Pope don't come" at the peaceful rally.

 

"I cannot remain silent when the Prophet Muhammad is insulted," said Husamettin Aycan Alp, 25, a science student from Izmir in western Turkey. He added that Roman Catholic cardinals chose this Pope last year "because he is against Islam and [they] are concerned Islam is spreading in Europe".

 

The four-day visit is billed as an opportunity to heal rifts with the Muslim world after the Pope quoted a Byzantine emperor saying Islam was violent and irrational. He has stressed he does not share that view. The visit

 

will be closely followed by the Islamic world and is the most challenging of Benedict's papacy so far.

 

Speaking in the Vatican yesterday, the Pope said:

 

"I want to send a cordial greeting to the dear Turkish people, rich in history and culture. To these people and their representatives I express feelings of esteem and sincere friendship."

 

The Islamic Felicity party which organised yesterday's protest under the banner "against the crusader alliance" - a reference to the crusaders who crossed Anatolia 1,000 years ago on their way to Jerusalem - had expected an attendance of at least 75,000.

 

Before becoming Pope, Benedict angered Turks by speaking out against Turkey's move to join the European Union, saying it did not belong there because of its religion and culture.

 

Turkey's ruling AK Party government has kept a low profile in preparations for the Pope's visit, with talks still in progress as to whether Tayyip Erdogan, the prime minister, a pious Muslim, will meet him before leaving for a NATO summit in Riga.

 

With a general election due next year the AK Party, which has roots in political Islam, must balance a rise in nationalism as well as its support base among conservative Muslims. Turkey is officially a rigidly secular country, but predominantly Muslim.

 

The main purpose of Pope Benedict's visit is to meet Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, the Istanbul-based leader of the world's Orthodox Christians, whom Turkish nationalists see as a tool of their ancient rival Greece.

 

http://news.scotsman.com/international.cfm?id=1754982006

 

If you're clicking the link you should read some of the feedback comments too...  such as "Media and Muslims take the Pope's comments out of context. It shows the media to be its typical biased self and it shows Turks to be quite ignorant and intollerant. I will crusade against jihadists. Bring it.

 

:lol:

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The world would be so much better without religions.

 

Bit simplistic that, though? Something else would fill the void. Human nature.

 

Yeah, but it would take them time to build up the power and influence to manipulate people like religions do.

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The world would be so much better without religions.

 

Bit simplistic that, though? Something else would fill the void. Human nature.

 

All that's missing from the above is the phrase "Stands to reason, doesn't it?"  bluebiggrin.gif

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The world would be so much better without religions.

 

Bit simplistic that, though? Something else would fill the void. Human nature.

 

All that's missing from the above is the phrase "Stands to reason, doesn't it?" bluebiggrin.gif

 

Stands to reason, doesn't it?

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The world would be so much better without religions.

 

Bit simplistic that, though? Something else would fill the void. Human nature.

 

All that's missing from the above is the phrase "Stands to reason, doesn't it?" bluebiggrin.gif

 

Stands to reason, doesn't it?

 

Or how about "Has Geoff been in?" or "Got change for the machine, mate?"  bluebiggrin.gif

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Source: http://education.guardian.co.uk/schools/story/0,,1957858,00.html

 

Revealed: rise of creationism in UK schools

 

 

PR packs spread controversial theory

 

James Randerson, science correspondent

Monday November 27, 2006

The Guardian

 

Dozens of schools are using creationist teaching materials condemned by the government as "not appropriate to support the science curriculum", the Guardian has learned.

 

The packs promote the creationist alternative to Darwinian evolution called intelligent design and the group behind them said 59 schools are using the information as "a useful classroom resource".

 

A teacher at one of the schools said it intended to use the DVDs to present intelligent design as an alternative to Darwinism. Nick Cowan, head of chemistry at Bluecoat school, in Liverpool, said: "Just because it takes a negative look at Darwinism doesn't mean it is not science. I think to critique Darwinism is quite appropriate."

 

But the government has made it clear that "neither intelligent design nor creationism are recognised scientific theories". The chairman of the parliamentary science and technology select committee, the Lib Dem MP Phil Willis, said he was horrified that the packs were being used in schools.

 

"I am flabbergasted that any head of science would give credence to this creationist theory and be prepared to put it alongside Darwinism," he said. "Treating it as an alternative centralist theory alongside Darwinism in science lessons is deeply worrying."

 

The teaching pack, which includes two DVDs and a manual, was sent to the head of science at all secondary schools in the country on September 18 by the group Truth in Science. The enclosed feedback postcard was returned by 89 schools. As well as 59 positive responses, 15 were negative or dismissive and 15 said the material was "not suitable".

 

"We are not attacking the teaching of Darwinian theory," said Richard Buggs, a member of Truth in Science. "We are just saying that criticisms of Darwin's theory should also be taught."

 

"Intelligent design looks at empirical evidence in the natural world and says, 'this is evidence for a designer'. If you go any further the argument does become religious and intelligent design does have religious implications," added Dr Buggs.

 

But leading scientists argue that ID is not science because it invokes supernatural causes. "There is just no evidence for intelligent design, it is pure religion and has nothing to do with science. It should be banned from science classes," said Lewis Wolpert, a developmental biologist at the University of London and vice-president of the British Humanist Association.

 

The DVDs were produced in America and feature figures linked to the Discovery Institute in Seattle, a thinktank that has made concerted efforts to promote ID and insert it into high school science lessons in the US. Last year a judge in Dover, Pennsylvania, ruled that ID could not be taught in science lessons. "Intelligent design is a religious view, a mere relabelling of creationism, and not a scientific theory," he wrote in his judgment.

 

It is not clear exactly how many schools are using the Truth in Science material, or how it is being used.

 

The government has made it clear the Truth in Science materials should not be used in science lessons. In a response to the Labour MP Graham Stringer on November 1, Jim Knight, a minister in the Department for Education and Skills, wrote: "Neither intelligent design nor creationism are recognised scientific theories and they are not included in the science curriculum."

 

Andy McIntosh, a professor of thermodynamics at the University of Leeds who is on the board of Truth in Science, said: "We are just simply a group of people who have put together ... a different case."

 

 

Nutters the lot of 'em.

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Source: http://education.guardian.co.uk/schools/story/0,,1957858,00.html

 

 

"We are not attacking the teaching of Darwinian theory," said Richard Buggs, a member of Truth in Science. "We are just saying that criticisms of Darwin's theory should also be taught."

 

"Intelligent design looks at empirical evidence in the natural world and says, 'this is evidence for a designer'. If you go any further the argument does become religious and intelligent design does have religious implications," added Dr Buggs.

 

Andy McIntosh, a professor of thermodynamics at the University of Leeds who is on the board of Truth in Science, said: "We are just simply a group of people who have put together ... a different case."

 

 

Nutters the lot of 'em.

 

The pushing out of Intelligent Design propaganda into schools is part of a long term campaign by ID advocates to undermine Darwinian theory:

 

"In fact, the idea that ID is religion-neutral seems to be somewhat disingenuous if one considers the stated aims of the Discovery Institute,9 the Christian think tank to which William Dembski is affiliated and which has been behind the ID push in recent years. In an internal fund-raising document known as The Wedge Strategy and written in 1999, it decries the “devastating cultural consequences of scientific materialism and its destructive moral, cultural and political legacies” and outline a 20-year strategy that aims “to replace materialistic explanations with the theistic understanding that nature and human beings are created by God”. The Discovery Institute was not best pleased when this was leaked online after being accidentally left in a copy centre.10 To achieve their aims, DI members attempt to portray evolution as “a theory in crisis”, and to encourage educational institutions to “teach the controversy” – both of which come as a surprise to evolutionary scientists. To them, evolutionary theory seems to be doing just fine, and any real controversy was conclusively laid to rest shortly after Darwin published. The “theory in crisis” idea attempts to portray evolution as just one possible hypothesis that has been given unfair prominence, while the idea of “teaching the controversy” is intended to be the thin end of the wedge, intended to create a situation in which people who wouldn’t necessarily support ID itself might at least mention it in the name of “fairness” and “balance”, even though there is no genuine scientific controversy to answer."

 

Full article at  http://www.forteantimes.com/articles/211_design1.shtml

 

 

 

 

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