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Do you support the teachers and other civil servants striking tomorrow?


Big Geordie
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Easy question, so feel free to answer! My wife is a teacher (and a member of the NUT) and I support her decision to strike over the proposed changes to teachers pensions by the Tory government. Upshot is (to cut short a long story) they want teachers to work longer, pay more into their pension and to receive less when they do retire. The extra contributions won't be heading to their pension pot,  but straight to the UK treasury to help pay off the deficit.

 

Funny how this whole crisis was started by the bankers (who escaped pretty much scot free) and in recent months the Tories have again decided to round on the public sector to pay for the mistakes of the money men in the city. Support within the public is divided at best, so the Tories seem to have done a good job in getting the mainstream media onside to join them in their attack. I can only see further disruption in the autumn if the government refuse to budge, with possibly the likes of UNISON amongst others deciding to join them.

 

My wife didn't become a teacher because of the so called 'Gold plated pension'. She became a teacher because she enjoys teaching a class of 30 4-5 year olds, despite often doing a 10-11 hour day, working at nights and also sometimes during holidays. Public sector workers go into the system, because they believe that whilst they will earn less on average than those in the private sector, that they would be looked after later on after years of service for the likes of you and me. If those benefits are not going to be there, then who the hell is going to want to go and work in the public sector? Is this going to take us down the road to more privatization?

 

 

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My union isn't striking (until all of the negotiations have definitely failed) so I'm in for work as per. School's closed to kids though.

 

It's sad that it's come to this and hope they manage to thrash a compromise out. 

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It doesn't matter whether or not I support their decision, it's their right to do so.

 

It's none of my business whether I think their wages or pension are acceptable.

 

do you reside in uk- pay income tax?

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It doesn't matter whether or not I support their decision, it's their right to do so.

 

It's none of my business whether I think their wages or pension are acceptable.

 

Some of the general public believe that they shouldn't have the right to withdraw their labour! All this is possibly an aftershock of the Tories taking down and demonizing unions, back in the 80's. Not enough people care anymore and just take whatever the government throws at them, whilst bitching at people who are prepared to stand up for their rights. Very selfish attitude, but that is also something that was encouraged back then. Hence 'I'm alright Jack - f**k you'.

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I can't see why people are getting so uppy about it all. People working in the public sector have had it easy as far as pensions go for far too long, and others in the public sector have now been hit with a far bigger blow. In the last year my step dad who works for the council has seen his pension lump sum when he retires cut by over 50%, and his weekly pension is down a considerable percentage as well, yet he has never even had the opportunity to strike or have a say over it. Other people in the private sector have lost their pensions altogether in the last few years. I also think it's wrong that teachers are even prepared to strike. Children's education maybe effected, they get plenty of time of during the year to go and march and do protests, don't do it when children need to go to school.

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I can't see why people are getting so uppy about it all. People working in the public sector have had it easy as far as pensions go for far too long, and others in the public sector have now been hit with a far bigger blow. In the last year my step dad who works for the council has seen his pension lump sum when he retires cut by over 50%, and his weekly pension is down a considerable percentage as well, yet he has never even had the opportunity to strike or have a say over it. Other people in the private sector have lost their pensions altogether in the last few years. I also think it's wrong that teachers are even prepared to strike. Children's education maybe effected, they get plenty of time of during the year to go and march and do protests, don't do it when children need to go to school.

 

What's the point in striking when the kids are on holiday? :lol:

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Children's education maybe effected, they get plenty of time of during the year to go and march and do protests, don't do it when children need to go to school.

 

That children's education is affected is sort of the point.  The purpose is to demonstrate how important they are.  A teacher won't make much of an impact striking during the summer holidays :)

I get that, but dragging a child's education into this is just dragging an innocent victim into the scenario. At the end of the day the teachers are in that job for the welfare of a child's education. I get that everyone has a right to strike, but sometimes some positions are held so high and so important that striking in large numbers cannot be possible.
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Seems I've caused quite a stir in high. My point is that in my view a child's education is more important than a teachers pension. If teachers want a decent pension then they are more than welcome to put into a private one like everyone else.

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Children's education maybe effected, they get plenty of time of during the year to go and march and do protests, don't do it when children need to go to school.

 

That children's education is affected is sort of the point.  The purpose is to demonstrate how important they are.  A teacher won't make much of an impact striking during the summer holidays :)

I get that, but dragging a child's education into this is just dragging an innocent victim into the scenario. At the end of the day the teachers are in that job for the welfare of a child's education. I get that everyone has a right to strike, but sometimes some positions are held so high and so important that striking in large numbers cannot be possible.

 

:spit:

 

I'll be kind and say you're a bit deluded on that one.

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I can't see why people are getting so uppy about it all. People working in the public sector have had it easy as far as pensions go for far too long, and others in the public sector have now been hit with a far bigger blow. In the last year my step dad who works for the council has seen his pension lump sum when he retires cut by over 50%, and his weekly pension is down a considerable percentage as well, yet he has never even had the opportunity to strike or have a say over it. Other people in the private sector have lost their pensions altogether in the last few years. I also think it's wrong that teachers are even prepared to strike. Children's education maybe effected, they get plenty of time of during the year to go and march and do protests, don't do it when children need to go to school.

 

What's the point in striking when the kids are on holiday? :lol:

 

:lol: :lol: :lol:

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Stifler...if teachers get worse conditions what calibre of person will want to give that education ?

Thats not the point in the strike though, the point in the strike is for a better pension and possibly better pay. I do agree that teachers have it hard now because a lot of our society think it is their job to be a parent when it's not, but in this case it doesn't appear to be what they are striking for.
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Seems I've caused quite a stir in high. My point is that in my view a child's education is more important than a teachers pension. If teachers want a decent pension then they are more than welcome to put into a private one like everyone else.

 

Surely you want the best people to teach your children? Rubbish conditions will mean you get rubbish teachers. Simple as that.

 

With regards to the pension, they are being asked to work longer, pay more in and get less at the end.  The extra that they pay in will head straight to the govt - not their pension pot.

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