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Remembrance Sunday


Haz
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For those who have died in WW1, 2 and Korea.  The rest, nope.

 

An ignorant statement.

 

A soldiers job in a democracy is to carry out orders not moral judgements on whether the cause is just.

 

A lot of teenagers, men an women, toon fans, have given their lives serving their country.

 

That sacrifice should be honoured regardless of whether scum like Bush and Blair misled the world to get them there IMO.

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I don't know, I find it hard to reconcile soldiers from back then with soldiers now. It's a career choice these days, however desperate that may be for some, soldiers back then were drafted in, terrified, frightfully ill-equipped and inadequately trained.  These people deserve our remembrance.

 

I remember those from the World Wars, but now? Our modern wars? Nah. I don't wish harm on them, but we live in a much more informative age and those signing up to the army since basically Vietnam/Korea know they're being bullshitted to and are fighting wars of agenda, not wars of justice. 

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Just a brief acknowledgement of our service men and women who died in combat and for those who still bleed.  We will remember them.

 

100% with this. Politicians make the wars, fallen soldiers should never face the wrath of the people to protect  politicians actions.

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Been to the cenotaph in Manchester. Very nicely observed two minute silence although a small minority still managed to act the twat by texting or munching on a subway sandwich throughout.

 

I think anyone who gives their life for the country is deserving of a show of respect.

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I don't know, I find it hard to reconcile soldiers from back then with soldiers now. It's a career choice these days, however desperate that may be for some, soldiers back then were drafted in, terrified, frightfully ill-equipped and inadequately trained.  These people deserve our remembrance.

 

I remember those from the World Wars, but now? Our modern wars? Nah. I don't wish harm on them, but we live in a much more informative age and those signing up to the army since basically Vietnam/Korea know they're being bullshitted to and are fighting wars of agenda, not wars of justice. 

Words fail me ,if our servicemen read this shit i hope they seek you out and do the honourable thing and put you out your misery ,i had a frien who died in the Falklands war and he joined the Paras to get a job and give himself a chance in life and to read that drivel you spout is disgusting and shame on you  :(
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Guest Howaythetoon

We owe them everything.

 

As for soliders back in the days of WW1 & 2 a good number signed up for the money, adventure and of course the honour. I'm a history buff when it comes to this stuff and many journals and letters from soliders back tthen often noted war is bull shit. In many respects I don't think there is a big difference between soliders of today and those of yesteryear if you like.

 

What has changed is why we go to war. We go to war today not to fight potential invasion or mass persecution of people but to change the political landscape. I'm not saying that never happened in WW1 & 2 because it did but initialy that was never the intention. We went to War with Germany second time around for example because they invaded an ally of ours and where would they then stop at after Poland? As proved they would have stopped at nothing and would have invaded England. We had to act.

 

I respect all servicemen and women and we should be proud of our army and those that represent it. As a nation we need an army and even though we may never all agree on the wars we wage and the combat we undertake and the legitimacy of such wars and combat, our men and women are fighting against the bad guys still. Its just a shame these days they are fighting the bad guys while under the management of similar bad guys. I.e. Tony Blair who lead this country into Iraq on a lie causing untold damage and leading to the death of tens of thousands and the displacement of many more, some of those deaths our own.

 

I always ask myself, could I be a soldier I always answer the same. No I couldn't. Thankfully there are men and women out there who do want to be soldiers because again, we need 'em.

 

I know a few soliders and when you speak to them and ask them what they are fighting for, underneath the bluster of "my country" they'll point to their mate across the room, their fellow solider, and say "him" or "her", in short their fellow countrymen in combat.

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I don't know, I find it hard to reconcile soldiers from back then with soldiers now. It's a career choice these days, however desperate that may be for some, soldiers back then were drafted in, terrified, frightfully ill-equipped and inadequately trained.  These people deserve our remembrance.

 

I remember those from the World Wars, but now? Our modern wars? Nah. I don't wish harm on them, but we live in a much more informative age and those signing up to the army since basically Vietnam/Korea know they're being bullshitted to and are fighting wars of agenda, not wars of justice. 

 

What a load of bollocks.

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Some people join the army because they want to fight and protect our country imo, I know I wouldn't be brave enough to do what they do and I am thankful that some are.

 

Massive respect to soldiers then and now.

 

I did nearly fuck up a minutes silence this morning though when I came back from the toilet and everyone was just sitting there not saying anything. Managed to realise before I blurted something stupid out.

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This is not the day to discuss the politics of war.  This is about the Poor Bloody Infantry (and the other services) who find themselves embroiled in war without choice.

 

My father served in the Navy during WWII and whilst he survived (being hit twice by Stuka fire) his family said he was never the same again.  All his life, that I remember was a man who was immensely proud to have served but broken by the experience.  And he said he was lucky.

 

Servicemen and women find themselves in theatres that may not be justifiable but they give their all and many pay the ultimate price.

 

That is enough for me to honour those in the past and the present.

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I have a lot of issues with the poppies (separately) and Remembrance Sunday in general. Not so much that I think the two minutes silence or anything like that is 'wrong', as such, just that at the end of the day - it is voluntary, and the stigma attached to those people who choose not to observe it for one reason or another is that they're pissing on dead soldiers graves (worth pointing out at this stage that I do actually observe the two minutes silence). What people forget is that the soldiers we're remembering were fighting for our freedom and right of free choice, so when people kick up a big stink about how people HAVE to observe the two minute's silence, and verbally attack those who don't, it's quite contradictory. I also have a bit of an issue with the fact the silence only remembers (officially anyway) a small amount of soldiers just from our country - I choose to use my two minutes to reflect upon all dead, injured and currently in action soldiers from every country in the world. Most people who get on their high horses about the two minutes silence on facebook etc probably couldn't give a fuck about it all for the other 364 days of the year, but I'll not get into that too much.

 

I also think the whole event incites a lot of racial hatred. I've seen so many things on facebook and stuff where people post pictures of a poppy which says "DON'T LIKE IT? THEN FUCK OFF OUT OF OUR COUNTRY". I haven't bought a poppy for the last two years, purely because since I've researched the guy behind the idea and the fund as part of my history course, I don't agree with what he did and I think many people aren't aware of some of the horrible things he did to gay or disabled soldiers before he set the fund up. That doesn't mean I don't respect what our servicemen and women have done for us (and are still doing for us) over the years, though, which is what a lot of people (not talking about this forum but in general fwiw) also fail to realise when I walk around with no poppy. A friend of mine was shouted at on the train last year for not wearing a poppy - he's Chinese, but has lived his entire life in the UK and was born here. A man and a woman told him "if you're not going to respect our country, fuck off back to wherever in Asia you're from". That's not what the poppy should symbolise, or incite.

 

I hope anyone who reads this and disagrees with it, however strongly, will be able to respond eloquently. I've done my best not to include anything too inflammatory or disrespectful, and I'll just say it again - I observe a two minute's silence each year, I respect what all of our soldiers are doing and have done for us, and I'd personally never have the balls to join the Army. I just have certain moral objections with some of the bad thoughts and hatred that the day can bring, and the poppy thing is a separate issue.

 

Sorry if I've worded any of that badly.

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I have a lot of issues with the poppies (separately) and Remembrance Sunday in general. Not so much that I think the two minutes silence or anything like that is 'wrong', as such, just that at the end of the day - it is voluntary, and the stigma attached to those people who choose not to observe it for one reason or another is that they're pissing on dead soldiers graves (worth pointing out at this stage that I do actually observe the two minutes silence). What people forget is that the soldiers we're remembering were fighting for our freedom and right of free choice, so when people kick up a big stink about how people HAVE to observe the two minute's silence, and verbally attack those who don't, it's quite contradictory. I also have a bit of an issue with the fact the silence only remembers (officially anyway) a small amount of soldiers just from our country - I choose to use my two minutes to reflect upon all dead, injured and currently in action soldiers from every country in the world. Most people who get on their high horses about the two minutes silence on facebook etc probably couldn't give a fuck about it all for the other 364 days of the year, but I'll not get into that too much.

 

I also think the whole event incites a lot of racial hatred. I've seen so many things on facebook and stuff where people post pictures of a poppy which says "DON'T LIKE IT? THEN FUCK OFF OUT OF OUR COUNTRY". I haven't bought a poppy for the last two years, purely because since I've researched the guy behind the idea and the fund as part of my history course, I don't agree with what he did and I think many people aren't aware of some of the horrible things he did to gay or disabled soldiers before he set the fund up. That doesn't mean I don't respect what our servicemen and women have done for us (and are still doing for us) over the years, though, which is what a lot of people (not talking about this forum but in general fwiw) also fail to realise when I walk around with no poppy. A friend of mine was shouted at on the train last year for not wearing a poppy - he's Chinese, but has lived his entire life in the UK and was born here. A man and a woman told him "if you're not going to respect our country, fuck off back to wherever in Asia you're from". That's not what the poppy should symbolise, or incite.

 

I hope anyone who reads this and disagrees with it, however strongly, will be able to respond eloquently. I've done my best not to include anything too inflammatory or disrespectful, and I'll just say it again - I observe a two minute's silence each year, I respect what all of our soldiers are doing and have done for us, and I'd personally never have the balls to join the Army. I just have certain moral objections with some of the bad thoughts and hatred that the day can bring, and the poppy thing is a separate issue.

 

Sorry if I've worded any of that badly.

Respect your views and can i make a point about the Chinese guy and the abuse he received was basically racist bigots i guess .
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I have a lot of issues with the poppies (separately) and Remembrance Sunday in general. Not so much that I think the two minutes silence or anything like that is 'wrong', as such, just that at the end of the day - it is voluntary, and the stigma attached to those people who choose not to observe it for one reason or another is that they're pissing on dead soldiers graves (worth pointing out at this stage that I do actually observe the two minutes silence). What people forget is that the soldiers we're remembering were fighting for our freedom and right of free choice, so when people kick up a big stink about how people HAVE to observe the two minute's silence, and verbally attack those who don't, it's quite contradictory. I also have a bit of an issue with the fact the silence only remembers (officially anyway) a small amount of soldiers just from our country - I choose to use my two minutes to reflect upon all dead, injured and currently in action soldiers from every country in the world. Most people who get on their high horses about the two minutes silence on facebook etc probably couldn't give a fuck about it all for the other 364 days of the year, but I'll not get into that too much.

 

I also think the whole event incites a lot of racial hatred. I've seen so many things on facebook and stuff where people post pictures of a poppy which says "DON'T LIKE IT? THEN FUCK OFF OUT OF OUR COUNTRY". I haven't bought a poppy for the last two years, purely because since I've researched the guy behind the idea and the fund as part of my history course, I don't agree with what he did and I think many people aren't aware of some of the horrible things he did to gay or disabled soldiers before he set the fund up. That doesn't mean I don't respect what our servicemen and women have done for us (and are still doing for us) over the years, though, which is what a lot of people (not talking about this forum but in general fwiw) also fail to realise when I walk around with no poppy. A friend of mine was shouted at on the train last year for not wearing a poppy - he's Chinese, but has lived his entire life in the UK and was born here. A man and a woman told him "if you're not going to respect our country, fuck off back to wherever in Asia you're from". That's not what the poppy should symbolise, or incite.

 

I hope anyone who reads this and disagrees with it, however strongly, will be able to respond eloquently. I've done my best not to include anything too inflammatory or disrespectful, and I'll just say it again - I observe a two minute's silence each year, I respect what all of our soldiers are doing and have done for us, and I'd personally never have the balls to join the Army. I just have certain moral objections with some of the bad thoughts and hatred that the day can bring, and the poppy thing is a separate issue.

 

Sorry if I've worded any of that badly.

 

All very eloquently put. Nobody can, nor should they, deny your freedom of speech and of thought - it was after all what so many fought and died for.

 

 

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All that said, my beliefs about the things beneath the surface of Remembrance Sunday shouldn't detract from acknowledging those who have given their lives, been injured or even survived through wars, for Britain (and any other country imo). :thup:

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I don't know, I find it hard to reconcile soldiers from back then with soldiers now. It's a career choice these days, however desperate that may be for some, soldiers back then were drafted in, terrified, frightfully ill-equipped and inadequately trained.  These people deserve our remembrance.

 

I remember those from the World Wars, but now? Our modern wars? Nah. I don't wish harm on them, but we live in a much more informative age and those signing up to the army since basically Vietnam/Korea know they're being bullshitted to and are fighting wars of agenda, not wars of justice. 

Words fail me ,if our servicemen read this shit i hope they seek you out and do the honourable thing and put you out your misery ,i had a frien who died in the Falklands war and he joined the Paras to get a job and give himself a chance in life and to read that drivel you spout is disgusting and shame on you  :(

 

So much for freedom of speech, eh, nice way to respect the dead and sacrificed of the world wars.  But I'll leave it at that as the capacity for a rational debate obviously lacks with some on this forum.  We all must think the same, repeat after me, we all must think the same.  Year after year.

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I don't know, I find it hard to reconcile soldiers from back then with soldiers now. It's a career choice these days, however desperate that may be for some, soldiers back then were drafted in, terrified, frightfully ill-equipped and inadequately trained.  These people deserve our remembrance.

 

I remember those from the World Wars, but now? Our modern wars? Nah. I don't wish harm on them, but we live in a much more informative age and those signing up to the army since basically Vietnam/Korea know they're being bullshitted to and are fighting wars of agenda, not wars of justice. 

Words fail me ,if our servicemen read this shit i hope they seek you out and do the honourable thing and put you out your misery ,i had a frien who died in the Falklands war and he joined the Paras to get a job and give himself a chance in life and to read that drivel you spout is disgusting and shame on you  :(

 

So much for freedom of speech, eh, nice way to respect the dead and sacrificed of the world wars.  But I'll leave it at that as the capacity for a rational debate obviously lacks with some on this forum.  We all must think the same, repeat after me, we all must think the same.  Year after year.

 

Christ Bluf. You're such a WUM. Shame on you.

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