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Vanguard are available in the UK. I'm not sure about Blackrock. Neither are mentioned here

https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/savings/stocks-shares-isas when discussing the cheapest way to invest.

 

I'd like to know if I invested e.g £1000 in a particular tracker fund exactly what it will cost me on fees but it's all 0.25% platform charge, 0.85% fund manager charge and the like.

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I read this article about Vanguard last year on the BBC: -

 

Vanguard move sparks price war for personal investors

16 May 2017

 

The huge US investment firm Vanguard is launching a new service to attract personal investors in the UK.

 

The company specialises in offering tracker funds with very low charges.

 

Until now most of its business in the UK came through stockbrokers and financial advisers, only dealing directly with individuals with at least £100,000 to invest.

 

Now customers will be able to open an account with just a £500 lump sum or a monthly investment of £100.

 

The move threatens to undercut existing stockbroking and investment firms that would have directed some clients to Vanguard funds while charging a higher fee than the firm is now proposing to levy.

 

Shares in the UK's leading online personal investment firm, Hargreaves Lansdown, fell almost 8% after the Vanguard announcement, as its own fees will now be undercut. It was the biggest faller on the FTSE 100.

 

Nick Train, who runs the investments of the Finsbury Growth & Income investment trust, told his investors on Monday: "It seems certain that the growth of tracker products has accelerated and this brings challenges, possibly existential challenges, for some traditional 'active' managers."

 

Vanguard's new online service will charge an account fee of 0.15% a year, capped at £375, plus an additional fee per fund, which would currently average 0.14%.

 

It will be offering only its own funds to general investors, unlike online stockbrokers and independent financial advisers (IFAs) who may offer a much wider range of investments such as individual shares, unit trusts and investment trusts.

 

Sean Hagerty of Vanguard said the firm was following the lead of the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which has complained that fees charged by the investment industry are too high.

 

"Our new online investment service is designed to help simplify and lower the cost of investing in the UK," he said.

 

"Only recently, the FCA's interim asset management market study report stressed asset managers' obligation to act in the best interests of investors, including requiring the industry to show how it delivers value for money.

 

"It also highlighted that fees have not decreased enough based on the economies of scale achieved by the industry. Vanguard agrees with these conclusions," Mr Hagerty added.

 

Vanguard was set up 43 years ago in the US, where it has seven million clients, and is now one of the world's biggest investment managers with £3.3 trillion under management.

 

Its pitch is that do-it-yourself investors should put their money into tracker funds.

 

Because these simply follow the rise and fall of indices such as the FTSE 100 index, these funds can be run very cheaply and thus charge very low fees.

 

The alternative is to pay much higher fees for so-called active management, whose returns may not be any greater.

 

In the UK, where it has be operating for just eight years, Vanguard has grown rapidly and it now invests £56bn for its clients.

 

Here's an article about star fund managers: -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-39152282

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The Economist has an article out every 3 months saying that past performance has zero correlation with future performance. Just pick a few index funds and add to it at a set frequency no matter how the market in general is doing would be my advice.

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Yes Newsted, you are a financial advisor. Therefore you don't give your advice away for free. There's plenty of free advice. People can do lots of research and take a risk or pay a financial advisor and hope their advice turns out to be good. Like I posted before, around 50% of funds fail to beat stock market trackers. Funds are created by experts who try to out perform the market.

 

I was just being a diva for a lark tbh. Just wanted to say people can ask if they want, but DIY's fine if you prefer it :thup:

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I read this article about Vanguard last year on the BBC: -

 

Vanguard move sparks price war for personal investors

16 May 2017

 

The huge US investment firm Vanguard is launching a new service to attract personal investors in the UK.

 

The company specialises in offering tracker funds with very low charges.

 

Until now most of its business in the UK came through stockbrokers and financial advisers, only dealing directly with individuals with at least £100,000 to invest.

 

Now customers will be able to open an account with just a £500 lump sum or a monthly investment of £100.

 

The move threatens to undercut existing stockbroking and investment firms that would have directed some clients to Vanguard funds while charging a higher fee than the firm is now proposing to levy.

 

Shares in the UK's leading online personal investment firm, Hargreaves Lansdown, fell almost 8% after the Vanguard announcement, as its own fees will now be undercut. It was the biggest faller on the FTSE 100.

 

Nick Train, who runs the investments of the Finsbury Growth & Income investment trust, told his investors on Monday: "It seems certain that the growth of tracker products has accelerated and this brings challenges, possibly existential challenges, for some traditional 'active' managers."

 

Vanguard's new online service will charge an account fee of 0.15% a year, capped at £375, plus an additional fee per fund, which would currently average 0.14%.

 

It will be offering only its own funds to general investors, unlike online stockbrokers and independent financial advisers (IFAs) who may offer a much wider range of investments such as individual shares, unit trusts and investment trusts.

 

Sean Hagerty of Vanguard said the firm was following the lead of the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which has complained that fees charged by the investment industry are too high.

 

"Our new online investment service is designed to help simplify and lower the cost of investing in the UK," he said.

 

"Only recently, the FCA's interim asset management market study report stressed asset managers' obligation to act in the best interests of investors, including requiring the industry to show how it delivers value for money.

 

"It also highlighted that fees have not decreased enough based on the economies of scale achieved by the industry. Vanguard agrees with these conclusions," Mr Hagerty added.

 

Vanguard was set up 43 years ago in the US, where it has seven million clients, and is now one of the world's biggest investment managers with £3.3 trillion under management.

 

Its pitch is that do-it-yourself investors should put their money into tracker funds.

 

Because these simply follow the rise and fall of indices such as the FTSE 100 index, these funds can be run very cheaply and thus charge very low fees.

 

The alternative is to pay much higher fees for so-called active management, whose returns may not be any greater.

 

In the UK, where it has be operating for just eight years, Vanguard has grown rapidly and it now invests £56bn for its clients.

 

Here's an article about star fund managers: -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-39152282

 

This fella went to my wedding! LMK what you need to know. I guarantee huge profits.

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Anyone jumped on a lifetime isa yet?

 

:thup: The beginning stages of saving for a house. If you know it's for that intention it feels like a no brainer. If it's for the purpose of retirement, maybe more consideration needed depending on circumstances.

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Guest Howaythetoon

Invest in yourself!

 

what do you mean? as in education ?

 

Aye possibly, invest in your health, leisure time with your family, your home etc. too. That’s my plan. I’ve looked at stocks, investments etc. and the returns don’t seem worth it, to me anyway.

 

Saving money is different thing when it comes to budgets etc. We waste a canny bit like and need to not spend as much as we do, usually on food, booze, SKY (the wife pays for that, I don’t watch it) and crap on the kids.

 

As for investments...

 

I’ve dabbled in gold before and made some canny returns on that. My watch as well, I’ve already been offered a good few hundred quid on top of what I paid for it and I’ve only had it a year or so.

 

I remember when I stopped smoking (now back on them like an idiot, less than 10 a day mind) and the money I would spend on tabs I’d put in a jar and after a few months there was enough to book me and wor lass a 2 week holiday to Tunisia.

 

If I’m to save money that’s where I’d like my money to go, not in some ISA, or stock. Good luck either way though, your a smart bloke so I’m sure you’ll come out on top.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Is it too late to stick a load of money into my ISA to gain the interest before the tax year starts again tomorrow

To gain the one day worth of interest?

 

Putting your money into your ISA on the last day of the tax year would just mean you'd used some/all of your 2017/2018 ISA allowance.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Anyone use Hargreaves Lansdown?

 

Currently trying to top up my Lifetime ISA but it's saying payments unavailable. Notice my bonus for last year went in today so I'm hoping they've just blocked further top ups while they sort that out for everyone but can't be sure.

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Should anyone have a genuine interest for potentially investing in film, feel free to PM me to discuss. High profile producer on board (behind two very successful franchises) as well as some early secured distribution. It's at first stage financing at this point for people who use VC terms. Also possible to secure an investment over a feature slate. If you want to participate, but feel like you can't contribute on a large scale - know that any level of involvement is better than none.

 

iA0YxDp.jpg

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Guest Howaythetoon

What is the best way to save for your kids? I’d like to put x amount of money away for my boys until they are 16 or whatever, but don’t just want to put it into a bank account as I’d like their money to get some form of interest while I being saved.

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What is the best way to save for your kids? I’d like to put x amount of money away for my boys until they are 16 or whatever, but don’t just want to put it into a bank account as I’d like their money to get some form of interest while I being saved.

 

Do you have accounts dedicated to when you buy your first home? In Norway we have that, essentially they are special high interest bank accounts locked until you turn 30 / buy your first home - meant to help young folk into the housing market, and the banks still profit since you need to get your house loan with the bank you have that account with to use the money for its intended purpose. win/win.

 

 

All my nephews and nieces have an account like that each where I deposit some funds to them every now and then when I have money to spare.

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What is the best way to save for your kids? I’d like to put x amount of money away for my boys until they are 16 or whatever, but don’t just want to put it into a bank account as I’d like their money to get some form of interest while I being saved.

 

Do a kids ISA for each of them :thup:.

 

Edit: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/special-reports/set-best-isa-child-grandchild/

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