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2nd jab sorted at centre for life. Basically straight in and out, and as painless as the first jab (for a needle-phobe like me).

 

Not really expecting any (based on others experience of the 2nd), but see if I get any side-effects/sore arm or owt.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
2 minutes ago, mrmojorisin75 said:

Covid spike in 3 weeks gonna be lolz eh

 

 

Doubling every 6 days isn't it? Over 100k per day. Shit.

 

 

Edited by pedro111

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I think they expect people to lock themselves down to avoid the spike TBH, which I probably will do to a certain extent. 
 

Definitely until I have both jabs and until the August date, I’ll try to avoid a lot of contacts with crowds. 

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1 minute ago, duo said:

Did those who attended Wembley have to provide a negative test?

 

More importantly, what type of test?

 

As far as I'm aware the LF tests are borderline useless unless you're showing symptoms.

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Blatant free for all now like. Plus with what Troll has been saying about a vaccine resistant variant by Christmas, the future is not looking too good but the vast majority seem to think covid is over and freedom day is in a couple of weeks when there will be approximately 100k cases per day. It never ends.

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22 minutes ago, pedro111 said:

Blatant free for all now like. Plus with what Troll has been saying about a vaccine resistant variant by Christmas, the future is not looking too good but the vast majority seem to think covid is over and freedom day is in a couple of weeks when there will be approximately 100k cases per day. It never ends.


A vaccine resistant variant by Christmas? 

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Just chatted with my pharmacist who is a sensible and pragmatic guy, he’s massively helped me through this by getting me my heart medications on the sly while the NHS has been unresponsive. His words: “it’s an astonishingly short-sighted decision. Medical community is pretty much united that this will cause thousands more deaths this year. It’s really sad”. 

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1 minute ago, AyeDubbleYoo said:


A vaccine resistant variant by Christmas? 

Trolls prediction a few pages back if we let this run wild in a vaccinated population like we seem intent on doing.

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Evolution works like this - give enough mutating viruses enough time and the best adapted variant will emerge.  Boris has just bought trillions of monkeys.  It truly is the blurst of times.   

 

 

Just to clarify a couple of things, though:

  • Vaccines teach the immune system to recognise the viral spike protein, and the virus counters by picking up mutations which slightly change the structure of this protein, making it harder to recognise.  It's unlikely a variant will suddenly appear that the vaccine is completely ineffective against, it's more likely to be a gradual change.  So while the vaccine may have been 95% effective against Wuhan-coronavirus, maybe it's only 80% effective against Delta (all these numbers are made up).  Then later Delta picks up more mutations and it's now only 60% effective, and so on.  This will consequently raise the herd immunity threshold, which is why you want everyone, even children, vaccinated.
  • Mutations that change the structure of the spike protein have a cost.  The spike protein has an important function already - the virus uses it to attach to cells that it then infects.  Alpha and Delta contained mutations in this protein that made it better at doing its job, and more infectious as a result.  But the mutations it needs to avoid the immune system are likely to also make it worse at this.  So it's likely that variants that become more resistant are less infectious (although this is not a given, and the effect might be very small).
  • If a vaccine-resistant variant does appear, it should be easy to make a vaccine that works against that variant.  With the mRNA vaccines, they contain the genetic code for the spike protein.  When the virus mutates, we can introduce the same mutations to the vaccine.  The problem isn't designing the vaccine, it's rolling it out.
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1 hour ago, duo said:

Did those who attended Wembley have to provide a negative test?

 

Yes, but they can easily be faked. I wouldn't be surprised if people took the test, tested positive, and then said they were negative anyway.

 

You just needed to show the text on the way in.

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1 minute ago, Froggy said:

 

Yes, but they can easily be faked. I wouldn't be surprised if people took the test, tested positive, and then said they were negative anyway.

 

You just needed to show the text on the way in.

They did the same at download, but I presumed there would be some sort of protocol to ensure that the texts were legit. Yikes.

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9 minutes ago, Troll said:

 

Evolution works like this - give enough mutating viruses enough time and the best adapted variant will emerge.  Boris has just bought trillions of monkeys.  It truly is the blurst of times.   

 

 

Just to clarify a couple of things, though:

  • Vaccines teach the immune system to recognise the viral spike protein, and the virus counters by picking up mutations which slightly change the structure of this protein, making it harder to recognise.  It's unlikely a variant will suddenly appear that the vaccine is completely ineffective against, it's more likely to be a gradual change.  So while the vaccine may have been 95% effective against Wuhan-coronavirus, maybe it's only 80% effective against Delta (all these numbers are made up).  Then later Delta picks up more mutations and it's now only 60% effective, and so on.  This will consequently raise the herd immunity threshold, which is why you want everyone, even children, vaccinated.
  • Mutations that change the structure of the spike protein have a cost.  The spike protein has an important function already - the virus uses it to attach to cells that it then infects.  Alpha and Delta contained mutations in this protein that made it better at doing its job, and more infectious as a result.  But the mutations it needs to avoid the immune system are likely to also make it worse at this.  So it's likely that variants that become more resistant are less infectious (although this is not a given, and the effect might be very small).
  • If a vaccine-resistant variant does appear, it should be easy to make a vaccine that works against that variant.  With the mRNA vaccines, they contain the genetic code for the spike protein.  When the virus mutates, we can introduce the same mutations to the vaccine.  The problem isn't designing the vaccine, it's rolling it out.

 

Thanks. Good post.

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11 minutes ago, Troll said:

 

Evolution works like this - give enough mutating viruses enough time and the best adapted variant will emerge.  Boris has just bought trillions of monkeys.  It truly is the blurst of times.   

 

 

Just to clarify a couple of things, though:

  • Vaccines teach the immune system to recognise the viral spike protein, and the virus counters by picking up mutations which slightly change the structure of this protein, making it harder to recognise.  It's unlikely a variant will suddenly appear that the vaccine is completely ineffective against, it's more likely to be a gradual change.  So while the vaccine may have been 95% effective against Wuhan-coronavirus, maybe it's only 80% effective against Delta (all these numbers are made up).  Then later Delta picks up more mutations and it's now only 60% effective, and so on.  This will consequently raise the herd immunity threshold, which is why you want everyone, even children, vaccinated.
  • Mutations that change the structure of the spike protein have a cost.  The spike protein has an important function already - the virus uses it to attach to cells that it then infects.  Alpha and Delta contained mutations in this protein that made it better at doing its job, and more infectious as a result.  But the mutations it needs to avoid the immune system are likely to also make it worse at this.  So it's likely that variants that become more resistant are less infectious (although this is not a given, and the effect might be very small).
  • If a vaccine-resistant variant does appear, it should be easy to make a vaccine that works against that variant.  With the mRNA vaccines, they contain the genetic code for the spike protein.  When the virus mutates, we can introduce the same mutations to the vaccine.  The problem isn't designing the vaccine, it's rolling it out.

 

Thanks for this. 

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3 minutes ago, ManDoon said:

They did the same at download, but I presumed there would be some sort of protocol to ensure that the texts were legit. Yikes.

 

They didn't even look. Just asked for proof and you flashed the phone. Didn't need to show ID at that point either.

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