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Interesting Origins of Everyday Sayings


Minhosa
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What's your favourite backstory to an everyday term used nowadays?

 

Run Amok = Comes from the Malaysian word amoq, which describes the behavior of tribesmen who, under the heavy influence of opium, became wild, rampaging mobs that attacked anybody in their path [emoji38].

 

Saved by the bell = Being buried alive was once a common occurrence. People who feared succumbing to such a fate were buried in special coffins that connected to a bell above ground. At night, guards listened for any bells in case they had to dig up a living person and save them “by the bell.”

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I have a book called Red Herrings and White Elephants.

If this is something that is interesting to you then you should get it, it explains pretty much everything and debunks some of the common misconceptions about the origins of our language.

 

Did you know that calling someone a berk, is the same as calling someone a cunt?

Berk is a shortening of term Berkshire Hunt, rhymes with.....

 

 

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7 minutes ago, pinkeye said:

I have a book called Red Herrings and White Elephants.

If this is something that is interesting to you then you should get it, it explains pretty much everything and debunks some of the common misconceptions about the origins of our language.

 

Did you know that calling someone a berk, is the same as calling someone a cunt?

Berk is a shortening of term Berkshire Hunt, rhymes with.....

 

 

Yes.

I used to work with a guy who was an expert on Cockney rhyming slang.

Most interesting aspect of it are it's origins in criminality and it's design to thwart the forces of law and order.

My favourite is Tilburys.

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3 hours ago, Minhosa said:

Saved by the bell = Being buried alive was once a common occurrence. People who feared succumbing to such a fate were buried in special coffins that connected to a bell above ground. At night, guards listened for any bells in case they had to dig up a living person and save them “by the bell.”

 

Nah mate, it's just slang from boxing that became mainstream. There's also no evidence that those coffin-bells were ever actually used. It's just a bit of historical macabre that became popular in stories later on. The same thing happened with the Iron Maiden which was also never actually used.

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1 hour ago, Miercoles said:

 

Nah mate, it's just slang from boxing that became mainstream. There's also no evidence that those coffin-bells were ever actually used. It's just a bit of historical macabre that became popular in stories later on. The same thing happened with the Iron Maiden which was also never actually used.

Next you'll be saying that there was never actually a Deaf Leopard.

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  • HUGZ changed the title to Interesting Origins of Everyday Sayings
18 hours ago, Haz said:

Suede boots were always Brothel creepers.

Brothel Creepers were the usually suede, flat-soled, 1.5 inch sole shoe, never a boot.

Originally worn by Teddy Boys in the 50s, revived by punk rockers in the 70s.

Also known as Beetle Crushers.

Suede boots were Chelsea Boots or Beatle Boots.

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