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Werner Herzog's 'Rescue Dawn'


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Guest Paul Allen

My friend and i saw this during TIFF(Toronto international film festival) very very good film.....acting is top notch...and there is the typical Werner feel to the movie with amazing backdrops......this movie prob. won't appeal to mass audience so that could be the reason for not having a wide release. If you get a chance do check it out.

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My friend and i saw this during TIFF(Toronto international film festival) very very good film.....acting is top notch...and there is the typical Werner feel to the movie with amazing backdrops......this movie prob. won't appeal to mass audience so that could be the reason for not having a wide release. If you get a chance do check it out.

 

Spawny get.

 

Still no release date announced for the UK.  And it's been put back a couple of times in the US because no-one's been paid yet, including Herzog himself.

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Woman, I truly believe nobody on here reads anything that is written.

 

Here's the review I wrote right after the screening of Rescue Dawn. Hope you find it useful.

 

You better.

 

http://www.newcastle-online.com/nufcforum/index.php/topic,29083.0.html

 

Just got back from the screening of Rescue Dawn by Werner Herzog.

 

Old fans of the German auteur might not find the unreachable elements from his previous work, but here is a complete film made of the Little Diegler Needs to Fly documentary made by the same director a few years ago.

 

Once again, he uses nature as a stunning backdrop to not just tell the story on a pretty canvas, but for the canvas to enliven the tale. (One particular shot of Bale scaling a lonely, majestic, crumbling rock brought gasps of appreciation from the audience.)

 

There were some elements that some might find "too American" in the Armageddon vein, but any such notions are quickly AK-47ed out of the screen as the film embarks on a survivalist quest, and you are sucked into the mental and savage landscape that surrounds our protagonist.

 

Bale is backed up by an underrated cast in the form of Steve Zahn and a collection of actors from both Asia and America, and by the time the film ends there is the same sense of fulfillment and adventure in the eyes of the audience as there is in the torn Diegler's. (The end sequences can get a little corny, but after what we've just witnessed, a little indulgence is forgivable I suppose.)

 

Strong performances and even better direction from a legend that knows how to paint a film, watch it, rent it, steal it or download it at a theatre or broadband connection near you.

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Woman, I truly believe nobody on here reads anything that is written.

 

Here's the review I wrote right after the screening of Rescue Dawn. Hope you find it useful.

 

You better.

 

http://www.newcastle-online.com/nufcforum/index.php/topic,29083.0.html

 

Just got back from the screening of Rescue Dawn by Werner Herzog.

 

Old fans of the German auteur might not find the unreachable elements from his previous work, but here is a complete film made of the Little Diegler Needs to Fly documentary made by the same director a few years ago.

 

Once again, he uses nature as a stunning backdrop to not just tell the story on a pretty canvas, but for the canvas to enliven the tale. (One particular shot of Bale scaling a lonely, majestic, crumbling rock brought gasps of appreciation from the audience.)

 

There were some elements that some might find "too American" in the Armageddon vein, but any such notions are quickly AK-47ed out of the screen as the film embarks on a survivalist quest, and you are sucked into the mental and savage landscape that surrounds our protagonist.

 

Bale is backed up by an underrated cast in the form of Steve Zahn and a collection of actors from both Asia and America, and by the time the film ends there is the same sense of fulfillment and adventure in the eyes of the audience as there is in the torn Diegler's. (The end sequences can get a little corny, but after what we've just witnessed, a little indulgence is forgivable I suppose.)

 

Strong performances and even better direction from a legend that knows how to paint a film, watch it, rent it, steal it or download it at a theatre or broadband connection near you.

 

Sorry Deej, never saw that  :oops:

 

Could someone merge?

 

You've got me even more keen to see it.  God knows when it'll happen.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...

Well, 18 May never happened  >:(

 

Wider US release this week though...

 

In "Rescue Dawn," screenwriter-director Werner Herzog continues his long obsession with obsessed men battling nature and themselves in a merciless wilderness.

 

That this particular protagonist, a German-born American Navy aviator shot down in Laos during the Vietnam conflict, will survive we know because Herzog made a documentary 10 years ago, "Little Dieter Must Fly," about his extraordinary story. This does nothing to diminish the harrowing tale of near-Messianic figure who wills himself out of a seemingly inescapable corner of Hell.

 

MGM has moved the release date of this film several times, finally pushing it to Wednesday, presumably to steal some Fourth of July patriotic fervor for the debut. One worries, though, that it might get lost amid the summer tentpoles despite it being Herzog's most mainstream and accessible film yet. Let's hope not.

 

Christian Bale plays Dieter Dengler and this is one of the actor's most complex and compelling performances. The movie stays with the character for nearly every shot, watching his transformation from a youth who embraces every aspect of the American way to a more sober individual whom nature and his fellow man want to break but can't.

The movie suggests that all the prisoners in a Laotian prison compound, run by proxy by the Viet Cong, are slightly mad. Bale shows how madness can creep slowly into a man's soul in ways much more frightening than physical abuse. Yet he never completely succumbs. Not that he doesn't see a ghost at one point and the rationality of his decision-making deteriorates somewhat.

 

As Dieter tells it to fellow Yank prisoners, Duane (Steve Zahn) and Gene (Jeremy Davies), he wanted to fly ever since an American fighter pilot zeroed in on him as a small boy in a German town during World War II. Even crashing in enemy territory during his first mission fails to discourage him. The first night in the prison camp, after being tortured for refusing to sign a "confession," he is plotting an escape. There is no escape, his fellow prisoners -- Americans and Vietnamese -- tell him. The jungle is the real prison. Where can you go?

 

But Dieter hatches a plan anyway and works tirelessly to convince others. He is the only true believer. But things go awry and he and Duane find themselves alone in hostile territory with no choice but to try to walk barefoot to the Thai border.

 

The brilliance of the film comes in small details: during the escape when Duane suddenly bends over to vomit because of anxiety and fear. Or in the strange smile on Dieter's face when he is paraded through a colorful village whose natives eye him with curiosity rather than hatred.

 

Zahn maintains the nuttiness that informs his comic performances, but here Herzog and the actor deepen the pathos in such behavior coming as it does in the face of almost certain death. Davies plays an airman with an unhinged mind who is all the more dangerous for that.

 

Herzog's use of lush jungle locations in Thailand, eloquent camera work and an unobtrusive but powerful musical score bring to life his latest story of a man in the wilderness battling the elements on his own terms.

 

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/film/reviews/article_display.jsp?JSESSIONID=gfyJGJ4BjLqJ8RFxy211d03q4w2f2rJQBsFYl01JB7bQvkdmh53R!-862252910&&rid=9452

 

No UK date...

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0462504/releaseinfo

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  • 11 months later...

Not a bad picture but not a landmark either. I actually watched it without knowing who the director was and then was astonished when I realised later it had been Herzog.

 

Dieter Dengler sounds like he should be on the same team as Didier Digard and Dirk Diggler.

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