Jump to content

Geordie slang


Guest TheDutchman
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest TheDutchman

Since Ive been active on this forum I often see words I understand after a few times reading. Like "charvs" or "tucked".

I was wondering if you could tell me some more typically geordie words or expressions. Or perhaps there's a book about it available...,

Thans  :thup:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me or does Geet not actually have a meaning?

 

Few examples

 

 

It was geet mint like.

 

I got this geet big hammer

 

He was geet tiny

 

I've always assumed it was just a habbit filler word.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me or does Geet not actually have a meaning?

 

Few examples

 

 

It was geet mint like.

 

I got this geet big hammer

 

He was geet tiny

 

I've always assumed it was just a habbit filler word.

 

It means 'great' or 'very', no specific meaning.

 

Can't really use it on its own though, Dutchman. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest TheOrder

Yee can larn yorsel a few words an phrases here;

 

http://www.geordie.org.uk/

 

:D

 

:lol: Thats great. Or should i say geet!! Cheers

 

You wouldn't say 'geet' in that context.

 

And I've never heard of 'tucked' apart from 'tucked into a bacon sarnie' and 'me mar tucked us into bed'

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me or does Geet not actually have a meaning?

 

Few examples

 

 

It was geet mint like.

 

I got this geet big hammer

 

He was geet tiny

 

I've always assumed it was just a habbit filler word.

 

It means 'great' or 'very', no specific meaning.

 

Can't really use it on its own though, Dutchman. ;)

 

True that's just twigged...

 

But i've it and heard it used alot just randomly..

 

"Aye i nah, he geet said that he needed to....."

 

"Aye i've just been to the shop n geet now i've gotta go to the pub"

 

etc..

 

 

I dinnah, it's still a mint word.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Na/Nee = No

 

You've got to be careful though because although they both mean 'no' they both have different meanings.

 

If you're answering a question by saying no - then you'd say 'Na'

 

"Are ye gannin doon the pub the neet?" (Are you going to the pub tonight?)

"Na" (No)

 

If you're refering to an amount of something, then you use 'Nee'

 

"There was nee one there" (There was no one there)

"There's nee milk left" (There's no milk left)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me or does Geet not actually have a meaning?

 

Few examples

 

 

It was geet mint like.

 

I got this geet big hammer

 

He was geet tiny

 

I've always assumed it was just a habbit filler word.

 

It means 'great' or 'very', no specific meaning.

 

Can't really use it on its own though, Dutchman. ;)

 

i would say it meant 'really'

it was geet massive

it was really massive

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's canny hard explaining the various uses of canny to a non-Geordie.

 

quite or alright

What does referring to someone as 'dead canny' mean then? Or if someone said they were 'very canny' when asked how they were doing for example?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest TheDutchman

I find the geordie accent so endearing. When I was living in Newcastle a few years ago, simply loved it. Plus you cannot avoid it rubbing off on you.

 

Well I dont speak english very well. But I can easily understand the english spoken on the BBC. Do you think its hard for me to understand you lads?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...