Jump to content

learning the drums?


Guest maddog
 Share

Recommended Posts

Guest makemeacupoftea

yeh i play the drums

 

when starting try and get RHYTHM!

 

start by consistently hitting the hi hat and then adding bass drum and snare drum( at seperate hits)

 

---h---h---h---h---h---h---h---h---h---h---h---h---h---h--h--

-------------s----------------s-----------------s----------------s

---b-----------------b----------------b-----------------b

 

h = hithat

s = snare

b= base

 

you should understand it and follow it

 

dont play while looking at it, you wont be able too!

 

just look and try and take it in then play

 

you might not understand this...oh well

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest Alan Shearer 9

drumming is pretty hard imo. I'm good at the bongos because I got the rhythm but it's the cordination that gets me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest toonelaide

I'm a drummer who played seriously for a long time, but now only bash them a few times a year. Find a mate whoes a drummer and ask him to show you the simple rock beat, then you'll be having plenty of fun. In general though I'd advise getting one-on-one lessons, for any instrument, if you self teach you might develop bad habits, a good teacher should at least give you good basics, and like anything, the basics matter. Also I advise looking into Jazz drumming, even if you have no intention of playing jazz, it will make you a much better musician and will improve your other styles

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest gimp suit

i learnt in high school but never went so far as to join a band or anything. still drum endlessly away to every single song. even when i'm playing an air guitar i'm strumming to the durmbeat as opposed to the guitar beat.

 

what i recommend is a simple rock beat that in high school, was called "rock 4" i think. so do the following in a simple beat, fast or slow:

 

R R B R

 

R = Right

B = Both (right and left)

 

keep doing that. just tap the desk or anything really. it will work with most songs, apart from maybe needing to do it faster and stuff.

 

then of course, comes the foot. that's different, and is the whole skill of drumming.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest maddog

hey guys nice advice keep it coming... yes im thinking of taking lessons, prob take them in the summer cause ill have time then with college having holidays.. would 2 months of lessons be enough... and some advice on a drumkit... what should i look for in a drumkit im going to buy seeing as im just starting out..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest toonelaide

hey guys nice advice keep it coming... yes im thinking of taking lessons, prob take them in the summer cause ill have time then with college having holidays.. would 2 months of lessons be enough... and some advice on a drumkit... what should i look for in a drumkit im going to buy seeing as im just starting out..

 

It's hard to say how much you'll get from a short period of lessons, Just a few lessons can make a big difference, depending on how good the teacher is for you and how much practice you can get in. Ongoing lessons for a while is ideal but obviously depends on how much free time you have and how much it costs. Two months could give you a good start, if you are only doing 2 months I'd recommend you let your teacher know, that way they'll have a better idea of what to teach you and may also be able to give you exersized to do after your lessons end ect. Also they could potentially point you in to some good self-teaching books, websites ect.

 

On Kit's, the first kit I got was just a cheapish starters kit, but after a while I bought the best possible skins for the drums and it improved the sound out of site, when I eventually traded in the kit on an upgrade I got a really good price because it had great skins. The ones I like are the REMO ones which have two layers and oil in between the layers. Just checked the actual name, REMO WEATHERKING PINSTRIPES. They make the drums sound nice and warm, they have lasted me for a long long time, but I was never one to really thrash my drums (although I was a metal drummer). They aren't that cheap but that's a good hint for making your kit sound better than it really is.

 

I think the type of kit a lot of people have is the Pearl Export Series. It's good enough for most bands (bands that play pub gigs ect) but is not too pricey. Sits there nicely in the market for those that are serious but not paying ridiculous money. Still not cheap, if you are just playing for yourself or aren't in a serious band it may be paying too much.

 

For cymbals consider the 2nd hand market as they can be very costly, but also check for cracks around the edges, these cracks can get bigger and if you don't get them cut out (some music stores may do this for you) they can ruin the whole cymbal. So be careful what your buying is in good condition.

 

As for sticks I always preffered the wooden tipped ones to the plastic tips, because the plastic tips leave little plastic streaks on your drums.

 

Something I'd recommend thinking about, getting a double bass pedal. Even a mediocre double bass player can do some impressive things, there are fills you can do using the double bass that make you sound a hell of a lot better than you are for example. I had some double bass teaching tapes by Rod Morgenstein, it was made in the 80's but as he said, "Imagine if your feet could do just a fraction of what your hands could do, you'd probably be the talk of the drumming community". A word of warning though, my old teacher used to think people shouldn't get a double bass pedal till they were really-really good with their single bass. Because he thought having a double bass pedal prevented you from developing your single bass to the level it should be. This was true for me, I never was anywhere near as fast with one foot as my teacher and probably because I started using double bass early. So it's something well worth doing, but you may want to hold off until you're at a the standard where you are "amazing" with one foot before you invest in a double bass pedal.

 

Just so you know, I haven't been serious about drumming for a few years so there may be better skins out there ect. Ask your teacher these things because if they are really good they'll be more up to date. Even without a teacher ask any drummers you know. Especially think long and hard about purchasing a kit because it's a big investment, another good thing, some teachers can get you a discount if they refer you to certain stores. Ask around about kits' what they are like ect, and also keep in mind the things you want.

 

Just one point on buying starters kits, if you get serious you may end up trading in your staters kit early in your career, something worth considering, perhaps you want to think about holding off on buying your own kit until you can get one that's much better than a starter's kit. You can still become good using a lower standard kit, the main reason for upgrading is when you start performing and want a better sound.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest maddog

toonelaide top post man, ive bookmarked this thread... gonna research about available drums soon ill sure be coming back to this thread.

Link to post
Share on other sites

drumming is pretty hard imo. I'm good at the bongos because I got the rhythm but it's the cordination that gets me.

 

same here, my hands can do all the stuff, but my feet go all retarded when im layin down a funky beat with the drumsticks. i'm a hopeless case really.

 

good thing I can play guitar.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest toonelaide

toonelaide top post man, ive bookmarked this thread... gonna research about available drums soon ill sure be coming back to this thread.

 

No worries mate, as I've said ask around because others may be able to give you more current advice. Hope it all goes well, they are a really fun instrument to play.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I've been trying to learn the drums recently, for any drummers on here what is the secret to a really fast snare roll? Is it how you hold the sticks?Was trying to play along with that arctic monkeys song - good on the dancefloor and struggling witht he fast wee snare rolls in it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

I'm gonna learn how to play the synth. Got an old Roland D5 to start out with, anyone here play?

 

I play keyboards yeah. I played piano aswell so I just went from that. Synths are easy if you know what the notes are or have any piano experience. Even then it doesn't take long to pick up.

 

Getting a loan of a microkorg soon, should be fun!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest firetotheworks

I'm gonna learn how to play the synth. Got an old Roland D5 to start out with, anyone here play?

 

Aye. Welcome to a beautiful world.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm gonna learn how to play the synth. Got an old Roland D5 to start out with, anyone here play?

 

Aye. Welcome to a beautiful world.

 

Was hoping you'd reply. :lol: You think a Roland D5 will be alright to start out with?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm gonna learn how to play the synth. Got an old Roland D5 to start out with, anyone here play?

 

I play keyboards yeah. I played piano aswell so I just went from that. Synths are easy if you know what the notes are or have any piano experience. Even then it doesn't take long to pick up.

 

Getting a loan of a microkorg soon, should be fun!

 

Ahh nice one, I looked into getting a microkorg a while back, look really fun.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Guest firetotheworks

I'm gonna learn how to play the synth. Got an old Roland D5 to start out with, anyone here play?

 

Aye. Welcome to a beautiful world.

 

Was hoping you'd reply. :lol: You think a Roland D5 will be alright to start out with?

 

Aye, some of the patches on that will be lush, but it might not be the best thing to learn synthesis on, since it uses LA Synthesis. If you can work it out though, then moving onto a subtractive synth after that wont be a problem for you. I still think using the standard subtractive synth in Reason is the best way to learn though, but you'll get a canny few 80's pop sounds out of a D5, and a few Brian Eno type pads. You'll definitely have fun with it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...