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Operacion Puerto


James
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operacion_Puerto

 

The Operación Puerto doping case (derived from Operación Puerto meaning Operation Mountain Pass) is a Spanish doping case against doctor Eufemiano Fuentes and a number of accomplices, started in May 2006. He is accused of administering prohibited doping products to professional athletes, to enhance their performance. He is said to have helped 200 athletes, of whom only 34 names of professional road bicycle racers have been released. Each cyclist also faces individual doping accusations in accordance with international sports doping rules. As of November 2006, 17 have been acquitted and none have been convicted.

 

On July 5, 2006, Eufemiano Fuentes was quite indignant that only the names of cyclists have been released, and stated that he had also worked with tennis and football players. On July 27, 2006, IAAF was assured by Spanish prosecutors that no track and field athletes were involved. On 23 September 2006, former cyclist Jesus Manzano told reporters from France 3 that he had seen "well-known footballers" from La Liga visit the offices of Dr Eufemiano Fuentes.

 

No other athletes have been named.

 

6 months on, and despite evidence (all circumstancial) being provided to FIFA, there has been no investigation or action taken. Why not I would ask if I didn't already know the answer.

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Guest Gemmill

I might be speaking out of turn here on something you witter on about quite a lot T27, but I reckon the papers would be making a bigger deal of this story if there was any substance to it.  :thup:  The fact that you're getting your links from Wikipedia tells its own story.  bluebigrazz.gif

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I might be speaking out of turn here on something you witter on about quite a lot T27, but I reckon the papers would be making a bigger deal of this story if there was any substance to it.  :thup:  The fact that you're getting your links from Wikipedia tells its own story.  bluebigrazz.gif

 

Is in the Spanish and French papers pretty often actually.

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Drug testing in football is a joke when compared to other, supposedly less professional (and certainly less lucrative), sports.

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Drug testing in football is a joke when compared to other, supposedly less professional (and certainly less lucrative), sports.

 

Drug testing is useless to be honest. Unless you are stupid enough to take a recreational drug you will get away with it as the drugs are always one step ahead of the testers, while specialisty drugs and lawyers can get you off the hook for most substances anyway.

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Guest Gemmill

Also Gemmill, football accounts for the reason a majority of people buy British newspapers. Reduced following of football leads to the reduced circulation in newspapers.

 

:lol:  Because football will cease to exist if you lift the lid on this scandal, won't it?  bluebigrazz.gif  NEWS sells newspapers.  Footballers all being drugged up to they eyeballs is NEWS.  Don't think for a second that the papers wouldn't be all over this one if there was even a sniff (snort) of a story.

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Drug testing in football is a joke when compared to other, supposedly less professional (and certainly less lucrative), sports.

 

Drug testing is useless to be honest. Unless you are stupid enough to take a recreational drug you will get away with it as the drugs are always one step ahead of the testers, while specialisty drugs and lawyers can get you off the hook for most substances anyway.

How come people frequently get caught in cycling, athletics, etc. then? And lawyers don't come into it if the governing bodies lay down the rules properly - i.e. you're caught so you're banned for x amount of time.

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Also Gemmill, football accounts for the reason a majority of people buy British newspapers. Reduced following of football leads to the reduced circulation in newspapers.

A huge scandal would sell shitloads more papers and football would recover quickly enough. There have been bigger scandals in the past.

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Drug testing in football is a joke when compared to other, supposedly less professional (and certainly less lucrative), sports.

 

Drug testing is useless to be honest. Unless you are stupid enough to take a recreational drug you will get away with it as the drugs are always one step ahead of the testers, while specialisty drugs and lawyers can get you off the hook for most substances anyway.

How come people frequently get caught in cycling, athletics, etc. then? And lawyers don't come into it if the governing bodies lay down the rules properly - i.e. you're caught so you're banned for x amount of time.

 

Cycling and athletics use retrospective testing, ie they freeze several samples of blood and urine, and then whenever a new drug is discovered, they test for it in the old samples.

 

Since customs authorities accidentally stumbled across half of Columbia in a team doctor's car in 1998, the UCI have frequently requested that French and Spanish police search cyclists properties under warrant. This is what leads to the most prosecution, while interrogation usually leads to the searching of someone elses premises.

 

It is also worth mentioning people in many sports get caught especially cyclists and track sprinters, but unless you are caught with the drug in your possession, you are unlikely to be prosecuted if you can pay for a good enough lawyer.

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Drug testing in football is a joke when compared to other, supposedly less professional (and certainly less lucrative), sports.

 

Drug testing is useless to be honest. Unless you are stupid enough to take a recreational drug you will get away with it as the drugs are always one step ahead of the testers, while specialisty drugs and lawyers can get you off the hook for most substances anyway.

How come people frequently get caught in cycling, athletics, etc. then? And lawyers don't come into it if the governing bodies lay down the rules properly - i.e. you're caught so you're banned for x amount of time.

 

Cycling and athletics use retrospective testing, ie they freeze several samples of blood and urine, and then whenever a new drug is discovered, they test for it in the old samples.

 

Since customs authorities accidentally stumbled across half of Columbia in a team doctor's car in 1998, the UCI have frequently requested that French and Spanish police search cyclists properties under warrant. This is what leads to the most prosecution, while interrogation usually leads to the searching of someone elses premises.

 

It is also worth mentioning people in many sports get caught especially cyclists and track sprinters, but unless you are caught with the drug in your possession, you are unlikely to be prosecuted if you can pay for a good enough lawyer.

Aye and in those sports athletes are banned which proves those tests aren't useless and those methods could be introduced into football. Cheers for saving me the bother of pointing out your previous post, i.e. "Drug testing is useless" was bollocks though  tongue.gif

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Drug testing in football is a joke when compared to other, supposedly less professional (and certainly less lucrative), sports.

 

Drug testing is useless to be honest. Unless you are stupid enough to take a recreational drug you will get away with it as the drugs are always one step ahead of the testers, while specialisty drugs and lawyers can get you off the hook for most substances anyway.

How come people frequently get caught in cycling, athletics, etc. then? And lawyers don't come into it if the governing bodies lay down the rules properly - i.e. you're caught so you're banned for x amount of time.

 

Cycling and athletics use retrospective testing, ie they freeze several samples of blood and urine, and then whenever a new drug is discovered, they test for it in the old samples.

 

Since customs authorities accidentally stumbled across half of Columbia in a team doctor's car in 1998, the UCI have frequently requested that French and Spanish police search cyclists properties under warrant. This is what leads to the most prosecution, while interrogation usually leads to the searching of someone elses premises.

 

It is also worth mentioning people in many sports get caught especially cyclists and track sprinters, but unless you are caught with the drug in your possession, you are unlikely to be prosecuted if you can pay for a good enough lawyer.

Aye and in those sports athletes are banned which proves those tests aren't useless and those methods could be introduced into football. Cheers for saving me the bother of pointing out your previous post, i.e. "Drug testing is useless" was bollocks though  tongue.gif

 

Only about 25% of cyclists are banned, the rest are suspended by their own teams pending investigation, and are usually back riding 3 months later.

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Drug testing in football is a joke when compared to other, supposedly less professional (and certainly less lucrative), sports.

 

Drug testing is useless to be honest. Unless you are stupid enough to take a recreational drug you will get away with it as the drugs are always one step ahead of the testers, while specialisty drugs and lawyers can get you off the hook for most substances anyway.

How come people frequently get caught in cycling, athletics, etc. then? And lawyers don't come into it if the governing bodies lay down the rules properly - i.e. you're caught so you're banned for x amount of time.

 

Cycling and athletics use retrospective testing, ie they freeze several samples of blood and urine, and then whenever a new drug is discovered, they test for it in the old samples.

 

Since customs authorities accidentally stumbled across half of Columbia in a team doctor's car in 1998, the UCI have frequently requested that French and Spanish police search cyclists properties under warrant. This is what leads to the most prosecution, while interrogation usually leads to the searching of someone elses premises.

 

It is also worth mentioning people in many sports get caught especially cyclists and track sprinters, but unless you are caught with the drug in your possession, you are unlikely to be prosecuted if you can pay for a good enough lawyer.

Aye and in those sports athletes are banned which proves those tests aren't useless and those methods could be introduced into football. Cheers for saving me the bother of pointing out your previous post, i.e. "Drug testing is useless" was bollocks though  tongue.gif

 

Only about 25% of cyclists are banned, the rest are suspended by their own teams pending investigation, and are usually back riding 3 months later.

Source?

Also, cycling is probably an extreme case as it has always been riddled with drugs/corruption.

I'd follow the athletics model for drug-testing in football where you have lists of banned substances, random testing and fixed penalties. I'm not sure how you've shown drug-testing is useless though and in football it is a joke. Players/clubs are given advance warning of tests.

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Drug testing in football is a joke when compared to other, supposedly less professional (and certainly less lucrative), sports.

 

Drug testing is useless to be honest. Unless you are stupid enough to take a recreational drug you will get away with it as the drugs are always one step ahead of the testers, while specialisty drugs and lawyers can get you off the hook for most substances anyway.

How come people frequently get caught in cycling, athletics, etc. then? And lawyers don't come into it if the governing bodies lay down the rules properly - i.e. you're caught so you're banned for x amount of time.

 

Cycling and athletics use retrospective testing, ie they freeze several samples of blood and urine, and then whenever a new drug is discovered, they test for it in the old samples.

 

Since customs authorities accidentally stumbled across half of Columbia in a team doctor's car in 1998, the UCI have frequently requested that French and Spanish police search cyclists properties under warrant. This is what leads to the most prosecution, while interrogation usually leads to the searching of someone elses premises.

 

It is also worth mentioning people in many sports get caught especially cyclists and track sprinters, but unless you are caught with the drug in your possession, you are unlikely to be prosecuted if you can pay for a good enough lawyer.

Aye and in those sports athletes are banned which proves those tests aren't useless and those methods could be introduced into football. Cheers for saving me the bother of pointing out your previous post, i.e. "Drug testing is useless" was bollocks though  tongue.gif

 

Only about 25% of cyclists are banned, the rest are suspended by their own teams pending investigation, and are usually back riding 3 months later.

Source?

Also, cycling is probably an extreme case as it has always been riddled with drugs/corruption.

I'd follow the athletics model for drug-testing in football where you have lists of banned substances, random testing and fixed penalties. I'm not sure how you've shown drug-testing is useless though and in football it is a joke. Players/clubs are given advance warning of tests.

 

Designer drugs cannot be recognised by standard drug tests. The drugs have to be discovered first by the authorities, and the only way of doing this is to randomly raid cyclists homes/team headquarters. Therefore drug testing is useless unless this is being done.

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So, once these raids have taken place, how do they determine whether or not people have taken these drugs? Do they by any chance test samples taken from athletes?  tongue.gif

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So, once these raids have taken place, how do they determine whether or not people have taken these drugs? Do they by any chance test samples taken from athletes?  tongue.gif

 

The athletes, having discovered that the authorities have discoved Drug X will move onto undiscovered Drug Y. The authorities will try to use past samples to get a conviction, but lawyers will get anyone testing positive off the hook by claiming that the samples have been tampered with during storage.

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So, once these raids have taken place, how do they determine whether or not people have taken these drugs? Do they by any chance test samples taken from athletes?  tongue.gif

 

The athletes, having discovered that the authorities have discoved Drug X will move onto undiscovered Drug Y. The authorities will try to use past samples to get a conviction, but lawyers will get anyone testing positive off the hook by claiming that the samples have been tampered with during storage.

If the scenario you describe always takes place and drug testing only works retrospectively after new drugs have been discovered via raids, how come athletes, for example in the Olympics, test positive and are banned/stripped of their medals while the games are still going on within a matter of days?

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Been sidetracked slightly. I'm saying that several sporting organisations could be covering up problems with performance enhancing drugs because they are unable to prosecute.

Don't you want to answer my question?  tongue.gif bluewink.gif

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Been sidetracked slightly. I'm saying that several sporting organisations could be covering up problems with performance enhancing drugs because they are unable to prosecute.

Don't you want to answer my question?  tongue.gif bluewink.gif

 

Only just saw it your question. I would say that it is funny that it is only athletes from certain nations that ever get caught.

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