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Pioneers of the North Book


Guest Randy Savage
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Guest Randy Savage

Anyone read this, and if so, was it interesting/any good?

 

I have loads of SAFC history books (pretty much them all really), and this one is more about the development of football in the North East.

 

I know the author is a mag and does your history books, and there is a strong Tyneside focus of the book, but it also covers the development of the game in County Durham and Teesside apparently. It was one of the prizes in the SAFC matchday programme at the time of release I recall.

 

I'm not too bothered about the Tyneside focus of the book, providing it doesn't prattle on too much about NUFC is fine! I was under the impression that it was more pre-nufc and focused on amateur clubs etc, but I'm not sure.

 

Can anyone advise? Is it a worthwhile read for an SAFC fan with an interest in the development of football in this area or is it too NUFC focused for a Sunderland fan?

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Guest Heneage

Anyone read this, and if so, was it interesting/any good?

 

I have loads of SAFC history books (pretty much them all really), and this one is more about the development of football in the North East.

 

I know the author is a mag and does your history books, and there is a strong Tyneside focus of the book, but it also covers the development of the game in County Durham and Teesside apparently. It was one of the prizes in the SAFC matchday programme at the time of release I recall.

 

I'm not too bothered about the Tyneside focus of the book, providing it doesn't prattle on too much about NUFC is fine! I was under the impression that it was more pre-nufc and focused on amateur clubs etc, but I'm not sure.

 

Can anyone advise? Is it a worthwhile read for an SAFC fan with an interest in the development of football in this area or is it too NUFC focused for a Sunderland fan?

That's what I call a notepad.

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Guest Randy Savage

Anyone read this, and if so, was it interesting/any good?

 

I have loads of SAFC history books (pretty much them all really), and this one is more about the development of football in the North East.

 

I know the author is a mag and does your history books, and there is a strong Tyneside focus of the book, but it also covers the development of the game in County Durham and Teesside apparently. It was one of the prizes in the SAFC matchday programme at the time of release I recall.

 

I'm not too bothered about the Tyneside focus of the book, providing it doesn't prattle on too much about NUFC is fine! I was under the impression that it was more pre-nufc and focused on amateur clubs etc, but I'm not sure.

 

Can anyone advise? Is it a worthwhile read for an SAFC fan with an interest in the development of football in this area or is it too NUFC focused for a Sunderland fan?

That's what I call a notepad.

 

Loads of good books and plenty of material, given SAFC were one of, if not the first, dynasty in English football.

 

Shame the way we set about destroying our once proud reputation from the 1958 (first relegation) onwards, but hopefully Martin can help bring back the glory days! If you don't have hope, you might as well not bother!

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Me dad's probably got this like.

 

Loves a bit of North East football history does my old man.

 

If it is described as you say, I'm imagining it probably has a canny bit about West Auckland in there?

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Product Description

 

This title provides the first definitive story of how football arrived in the Hotbed of the North East and Tyneside. It includes many previously unpublished and vintage illustrations of the Pioneers of the North. It features introduction by Alan Shearer OBE; Review coverage in local and national press and football media. The North East of England has long been recognised as a Hotbed of Football with both Newcastle United and Sunderland providing the English game with some of the finest ever line-ups and most celebrated players in football's history, as well as arguably the country's most passionate supporters. Pioneers of the North is a comprehensive account of how football developed and took a grip on the very life and soul of the region, on Tyneside in particular but also in Northumberland as well as neighbouring County Durham. Related in detail is the social and sporting background, the origins of football and its growth from Berwick in the north to Darlington and Middlesbrough in the south. The book has a principle focus on the important embryonic clubs of Tyneside in the late 1870s; Tyne Association and Newcastle Rangers and thereafter switches to the development of Newcastle United from their pioneering clubs, Stanley and Newcastle East End, as well as Newcastle West End, great rivals during the period from 1881 to 1893 when Newcastle United joined the Football League. Other significant clubs which took a non-league route in development are examined notably Shankhouse Black Watch as well as forgotten pioneer teams such as Rendel and Elswick Leather Works, all to figure in FA Cup action during the Victorian years. Personalities and celebrated names to generate what has now become that Hotbed of Football are explored, as are notable points in development and many of the famous matches of the Victorian era. The book is well illustrated with many rare archive photographs, as well as location plans of several of the now lost pioneering football sites of the distant past.

 

About the Author

 

PAUL JOANNOU was born and raised in the West End of Newcastle and for over 25 years has been associated with Newcastle United as official club historian. In that period he has written several definitive works on the Magpies including the club's acclaimed centenary history, United: The First 100 Years & More. Previous works for Breedon include Newcastle United: A Complete Record and The Hughie Gallacher Story. ALAN CANDLISH hails from the East End heartland of Byker and is also a life-long supporter of the Magpies attending St. James' Park on a regular basis since 1953. He has assiduously researched the history of the club at all levels from senior to junior teams for over 30 years. He is the author of Ha'Way/Howay the Lads, the definitive history of Tyne-Wear football derbies (which broke into the best sellers' charts in Sunderland!). For ten years he has contributed regular historical articles for the long-running Newcastle United fanzine The Mag.

 

(Sure the Macho Man has already checked the amazon product description out, but for others)

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Guest Randy Savage

Thanks for the responses.

 

From the description provided, it seems like it's worth a bash. If nowt else, as a (town) planner it'll be interesting to see some of the old plans and maps of areas I know as well.

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