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Deloitte Money List


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20. (17.) Newcastle United- €101.0m

 

The 2008-'09 season was a season to forget for Newcastle United as they failed to retain their Premier League status and relegated to the Championship after a sixteen-season spell in England's top tier. Nevertheless, the Magpies still totalled a €101 revenue to finish in the top 20 of Deloitte's Money Football League.

 

19. (-) Manchester City- €101.2m

 

Last season was the first season of the Abu Dhabi United Group’s ownership of Manchester City and the Citizens finished the Premier League in tenth position. Despute their slightly disapppointing performances, revenues increased by six percent to a total of €102.2 million, thus securing nineteenth spot.

 

18. (20.) Borussia Dortmund- €103.5m

 

Borussia Dortmund have climbed two spots compared to last season's Deloitte Money Football League top 20. BVB failed to qualify for European football last term, but average attendances of almost 75.000 per home game boosted their total revenues to €103.5 million.

 

17. (-) Werder Bremen- €114.7m

 

Werder Bremen are the first new team in this top 20 with revenues of €114.7 million. The Hanseaten made it into last year's UEFA Cup final and won the DFB Pokal, thus generating 26% more revenues than the year before. Broadcasting revenues were the major source of income for the Bundesliga side.

 

16. (13.) Schalke- €124.5m

 

Schalke slipped three places down the ranking due to a reduction in total revenues of €23.9 million. The Gelsenkirchen side continued to sell out its Veltins Arena, but a different mix of games (UEFA Cup instead of Champions League) resulted in a reduction of matchday income.

 

15. (14.) Tottenham Hotspur- €132.7m

 

Tottenham reached the Carling Cup final for the second consecutive season and finished eighth in the Premier League after a disappointing start to the season. The London side totalled revenues of €132.7 million, only two percent lower than last season's record income.

 

14. (16.) Olympique de Marseille- €133.2m

 

Olympique Marseille climb two spots in the Deloitte Money Football League and close the gap to French rivals Olympique Lyonnais to €6.4 million. Marseille only just missed out on the French title last year. Consistent Champions League qualification has kept the Ligue 1 contenders among Europe's top 20 money-spinning clubs.

 

13. (12.) Olympique Lyonnais- €139.6m

 

Olympique Lyonnais wer not crowned French champions at the end of last season for the first time in seven seasons. The Ligue 1 titans still totalled revenues of €139.6 million though and sit thirteenth in this ranking. Lyonnais revenues decreased by ten percent last season.

 

12. (9.) Roma- €146.4m

 

Roma lost three places compared to last season and have dropped from teh tope ten. The Giallorossi had a disappointing season on the pitch finishing in sixth position in Serie A and were eliminated in the Champions League in the Round of 16. Roma's revenues dropped to €146.4, a decrease of seventeen percent.

 

11. (15.) Hamburger SV- €146.7m

 

A rather successful season on the pitch helped Hamburger SV increase revenues by an impressive fifteen percent, despite not playing in the Champions League. HSV have almost doubled their revenues in the past five seasons and totalled an amount of €146.7 million last season.

 

10. (7.) AC Milan- €196.5m

 

Milan fall three places in the money league following a disappointing 2008-'09 season. The Rossoneri failed to qualify for Champions League football and entered the UEFA cup instead. This cost Milan €26 million in UEFA central broadcasting distributions. Commercial and matchday revenues increased, but not enough to make up for the aforementioned loss.

 

9. (10.) Internazionale- €196.5m

 

The Italian champions post a €23.6m (14%) increase in revenue to €196.5million. Internazionale have been the dominant force in the Serie A in the past couple of seasons, but still await Champions League glory. As with the other Italian clubs in the Money League, broadcasting provides the majority of the club’s revenue (59%).

 

8. (11.) Juventus- €203.2m

 

Juventus’ first Champions League campaign since 2005/06 helped drive a revenue increase of €35.7million (21%) to €203.2 million. The Turin side's matchday revenues remain the lowest of any Money League club. If the Old Lady is to increase revenue, they need to work on their attendances.

 

7. (8.) Liverpool- €217.0m

 

Liverpool's second place Premier League finish last term resulted in an increase of broadcating revenue. However, the Reds are still only the fourth placed English side in the Money League. Their quarter-final Champions League exit didn't do Liverpool any good financially.

 

6. (5.) Chelsea- €242.3m

 

Chelsea’s footballing fortunes were mixed in 2008/09. Managerial instability provided a backdrop for a disappointing third place finish in the Premier League. However, they made up for this by winning the FA Cup. Off the pitch Chelsea dropped out of the Money League top five for the first time since 2002/03, as revenue fell to €242.3million.

 

5. (6.) Arsenal- €263.0m

 

Arsenal return to the money top five after a one-year absence. Chief Executive Ivan Gazidis’ aim of running a financially ‘self sufficient’ club is assisted by repeatedly filling the Emirates stadium to its 60,400 capacity. Additionally, Arsenal grew its commercial revenues to €56.5million.

 

4. (4.) Bayern Munich- €289.5m

 

Bayern Munich saw revenues decline by two percent, but managed to hold to fourth spot in the Money League with a total revenue of €289,5 million. The Bavarians failed to win the Bundesliga, but did manage to win direct qualification for the Champions League, thus securing a considerable amount of broadcasting revenues.

 

3. (2.) Manchester United- €327.0m

 

English champions Manchester United dropped to third spot following Barcelona's extremely successful season. Manchester saw commercial -, matchday - and broadcasting revenue all increase and total a revenue of €327 million. Yet even this was not enough to retain last year’s runner-up position in the Money League, with further deterioration in the Sterling exchange rate compounding the effect of Barcelona’s more rapid revenue growth.

 

2. (3.) Barcelona- €365.9m

 

Champions League winners Barcelona will be absolutely deligthed with their sportive successes last season. Additionally, they had a good season financially, too. The favourable Euro to Pound Sterling exchange rate saw Barcelona leapfrog Manchester United into second place in the Money

League, with total revenues increasing by 18% to €365.9million.

 

1. (1.) Real Madrid - €401.4m

 

Real Madrid hold on to top spot in the Money League with ease and are the first sports team in history with revenues exceeding €400 million. Los Blancos might have failed to impress on the pitch last season, but they have every reason to be proud with their performances off the pitch. The club’s contract

with Mediapro combined with certain others, guarantees the club more than €1.1 billion over the seven seasons to 2013/14.

 

 

 

http://goal.com/en/news/755/europe/2010/03/01/1813235/top-20-deloitte-money-football-league-in-full

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I wonder if we will move up to about the top 10 if we go back up.

 

Definitely not, that revenue includes all the usual Premiership money.  Its still an extraordinary revenue for a club that was relegated that same season though and with any kind of moderate success we'd certainly jump up the list.

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91m sterling roughly, 7th highest in england despite finishing in relegation spots. Christ imagine what it would be with something resembling success.

how do spurs generate so much cash though, the carling cup aint worth much and neither is europa league which they had last season and they're ground ain't big

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91m sterling roughly, 7th highest in england despite finishing in relegation spots. Christ imagine what it would be with something resembling success.

how do spurs generate so much cash though, the carling cup aint worth much and neither is europa league which they had last season and they're ground ain't big

 

They get excellent prices for the players they sell.

 

Worth re-emphasising it's a revenue list. No mention of costs, as such, profits.

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91m sterling roughly, 7th highest in england despite finishing in relegation spots. Christ imagine what it would be with something resembling success.

how do spurs generate so much cash though, the carling cup aint worth much and neither is europa league which they had last season and they're ground ain't big

 

They get excellent prices for the players they sell.

 

Worth re-emphasising it's a revenue list. No mention of costs, as such, profits.

it can't all be transfer revenue for spurs though, do they have a huge corperate section? high ticket prices compared to everyone else? secret gold stores under whl?

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If I remember from articles down the years, German clubs and the league itself are fantastically well run compared to their English/Spanish/Italian counterparts.  Not surprising to see them make up 25% of that list despite not being considered a powerhouse league. 

 

Huge attendance numbers for clubs across the board. 

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Still can't wrap my head around the fact you're the 20th richest club in the world and yet got relegated. But I guess you have beaten that horse to death and took it to the slaughterhouse for steaks already.

 

I wonder how many currently Premiership teams will you still beat when this season's numbers are published.

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Very surprised to see Bayern Munich in 4th place.

not so surprising when you consider they're stadium holds over 69k and its average is near full.

 

Not really tbh. They had a modest Champions League campaign, which is the big money-spinner ordinarily. Also the German league isn't exactly one of the most lucrative as far as I know and I wouldn't have thought they match the likes of Arsenal, Chelsea and Liverpool in terms of worldwide merchandising revenue.

 

I suppose they were 4th in the list last year as well, but I was just surprised to see them there for some reason. Am I right in saying that teams negotiate their own individual TV rights in Germany? I suppose that makes a significant difference.

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You think a list like this would stay relatively stagnant over time, except for teams with massive benefactors like Man City who will occasionally invade. All the teams in the top 15 have massive stadiums and consistently qualify for European competition. You don't see anything immediate happening to change that.

 

You could of course also follow the Newcastle model of having 53, 000 idiots willing to pay god money to watch abject failure.

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Also, of Europe's top 20 average attendances last season, 9 of them were German.

 

You got a link for that mate?  I'd be interested to see where Newcastle figure.

Not to steal KSH's thunder, but I was just looking at them myself after that post : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Average_attendances_of_European_football_clubs  a solid 18th.

 

Chelsea need a new stadium, one of the top teams of Europe can't have such low attendances (although I'm aware they fill up Stamford Bridge nicely)

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Chelsea struggle to sell out tickets for most matches. I don't think spending all that money to upgrade their facility would be worth it, until there is a point where the demand for tickets greatly outweighs the supply of seats, like we saw with Arsenal. Otherwise, it just isn't smart.

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Chelsea struggle to sell out tickets for most matches. I don't think spending all that money to upgrade their facility would be worth it, until there is a point where the demand for tickets greatly outweighs the supply of seats, like we saw with Arsenal. Otherwise, it just isn't smart.

 

Do they? Stamford's Bridge capacity is 41,841 just a few hundred below the average in that list (which honestly is a bit hard to believe)

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With the '9 out of 20 of the top European attendances are from the German league' thing I was always under the impression that prices over there were far cheaper, which obviously doesn't necessarily translate to higher revenue compared to European competitors. But evidently it must do to an extent. It makes you wonder why German teams aren't right up there in Europe, although I suppose they're perhaps more prudent and not drowning in debt like in England. Also the perceived lack of glamour compared to England, Spain and Italy means they don't attract that many of the top, top players.

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I found a relevant, if quite old, article on the matter:

 

Chelsea’s attendance quandary

A quick analysis of low attendance at Chelsea

 

Attendances at Chelsea’s games have been volatile – despite an impressive and undefeated start to the season. We’ve had a look into what’s behind this trend and whether it should be a concern to Chelsea – or indeed to English football.

 

So what’s the problem? Chelsea’s average premiership attendance for their first four Premiership home games of the year – 41,845 – is, in fact, 98.6% of their capacity – fifth when ranked by this criterion and above their average for last year (97.2%). However, in the UEFA Champions league and the Carling Cup attendances were 77.9% and 61% of capacity respectively – averaging just fewer than 31,000.

 

Chelsea’s attendance during last year’s six home Champions’ League games averaged 93% of capacity – so even if they sold out all their remaining European games, they could only just equal that figure this year.

 

More worryingly for Chelsea, these falls are large in comparison to their competitors. Arsenal and Manchester United have only played a handful of home games outside Premiership but attendances have only slipped to around 90% of capacity – and are comparable with last year’s levels. The same is largely true for the other big teams in Europe including Juventus, Milan and Real where attendances compare well their domestic competitions.

 

The argument goes that Chelsea are boring and this is affecting attendances – but this isn’t backed up by the stats – in terms of goals and shots on goal Chelsea have more than any other team and besides, if true, this would surely also affect their Premiership attendance. So what is the explanation?

 

Research has looked into attendance levels and identified factors like proximity to large conurbations and a team’s historical as the fundamentals. At the margin, other factors like prices, the opposition league position (and their physical proximity) also play a part. When comparing these factors with the same time last year there’s one significant change – fans’ perception of Chelsea’s quality. Models suggests that, when all else is equal, attendance is driven by the similarity in quality between two sides, so, in part, Chelsea are a victim of their own success.

 

Still, whilst it’s largely just a Chelsea problem, the worst is over for this year. Chelsea’s remaining home Champion’s league game is against Liverpool and they are now out of the Carling Cup. Still, for the FA cup – and for next year’s competitions – Chelsea will need to look hard at their pricing strategy. Not only does low attendance affect revenue, the loss of atmosphere also damages the quality of the experience for players and fans alike. If this perception grows there is the risk that a couple of one-off’s could turn into a more serious problem.

------------------

Chelsea have been a bit notorious for pricing some fans out and having low attendance in non-Premiership games.

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With the '9 out of 20 of the top European attendances are from the German league' thing I was always under the impression that prices over there were far cheaper, which obviously doesn't necessarily translate to higher revenue compared to European competitors.  But evidently it must do to an extent.  It makes you wonder why German teams aren't right up there in Europe, although I suppose they're perhaps more prudent and not drowning in debt like in eNGLAND.  Also the perceived lack of glamour compared to England, Spain and Italy means they don't attract that many of the top, top players.

 

I imagine it's tough to play football whilst wearing lederhosen.

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