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Who do you want to manage NUFC ???


PCW1983
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Out of general interest who would you like to manage NUFC ?

 

Keep it real though Sir Alex wont really want to know will he lol  :)

 

And just as a foot note if you were going to give Roader the boot when would you do it ?  :roll:

 

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If the board wont back a decent foreign manager, I'd say Gary Speed would be my choice.

 

Keegan as manager, Shearer as assistant, Speed, Lee & Barton as coaches.

 

Along with Clark.

 

About the only people we could realistically attract here, but if all of them were together, i reckon they'd make a decent go of it, better than current.

 

If we still have any cred left past the Team Valley then Ranieri, Sven or some hotshot manager from South America that we've never heard of who wants to try his luck in Europe.

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Guest theunis

Well relisticaly would love to see Keegan and Shearer as assistant. But think they will go

 

Curbs probably i think is going to happen

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudio_Ranieri

 

Campania, Cagliari

Promotion from C1 to Seire A in successive seasons.

 

Napoli

4th in Serie A, introduced Zola.

 

Fiorentina

 

Promotion from Serie B to A. Won Coppa Italia and SuperCoppa Italiana.

 

Valencia

He was the coach from 1997 to 1999 and guided Valencia to the UEFA Champions League and the Copa del Rey in 1997. In his first spell Ranieri left a popular man, and has been credited for guiding Valencia onto subsequent successes in the Champions League and La Liga.

 

He was responsible for the development of several youth players at the club, among them Gaizka Mendieta, Miguel Angel Angulo, Francisco Farinos and David Albelda. Ranieri also signed several players who would become highly successful at the Mestalla, among them goalkeeper Santiago Canizares and Argentinian forward Claudio López.

 

Ranieri's first spell at Valencia is popularly regarded as a precursor of what would later happen at Chelsea, since both clubs achieved success which was in part attributable to the input of Ranieri.

 

Atlético Madrid

 

Ranieri joined the club in 1999 but while manager at Atlético Madrid, the club went into administration. Nearing the brink of relegation Ranieri resigned before he could be sacked by the late Atletico chairman Jesus Gil, who was notorious for sacking managers.

 

Chelsea

 

As manager of Chelsea from 18 September 2000 to 31 May 2004, he had to work hard to overcome the language barrier. When he arrived at the London club he could speak only limited English; fortunately, the club had a few who could speak Italian and Spanish and could help translate for him on the training pitch. Ranieri's first season comprised of inconsistent results, with Chelsea reaching sixth place and an UEFA Cup spot.

 

Ranieri worked to rebuild Chelsea in the summer of 2001, essentially creating a brand new midfield by signing Frank Lampard from West Ham United, Emmanuel Petit and Boudewijn Zenden from FC Barcelona, and Jesper Grønkjær from Ajax Amsterdam, as well as William Gallas from Olympique Marseille, for over £30million. Chelsea's league performance however did not improve much on the previous season, finishing 6th once again, but reaching the FA Cup final, though they lost 2-0 to Arsenal.

 

During the 2002-03 season and throughout his Chelsea days Ranieri was accused of over-rotating his squad, and picked up the nickname of the Tinkerman from the British media. Nevertheless Chelsea finished the season on a high, qualifying for the Champions League after beating Liverpool 2-1 on the last day of the season. Ranieri's achievement, coming after a close season where the only arrival was Enrique de Lucas from Espanyol on a free, was greatly appreciated by fans and the media alike. In addition, Ranieri succeeded in getting the best out of players like Samuele Dalla Bona and Mario Stanic and nurtured emerging talents in John Terry, Robert Huth, and Carlton Cole.

 

When Chelsea were taken over by Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich in 2003, Ranieri was given a large transfer fund but also found his job under threat. Days after the takeover Abramovich was spotted meeting with England manager Sven-Göran Eriksson, although the club denied Eriksson would be taking over at the time, these rumours would haunt Ranieri's season. Ranieri spent £120 million on players in the summer of 2003. These signings included Irish winger Damien Duff for a then club record £17million, English youngsters Wayne Bridge, Joe Cole, Scott Parker and Glen Johnson, Argentine pair Juan Sebastian 'Seba' Veron and Hernán Crespo, Frenchman Claude Makélélé and Romanian star Adrian Mutu, who would be sacked 14 months later for testing positive for cocaine.

 

The heavy investment brought the best league placing for the club in 49 years, finishing runners-up in the Premiership to the first side to go an entire league season unbeaten in over a century (sufficient to automatically qualify Chelsea for the lucrative group phase of the Champions League) and reaching the semi-finals of the UEFA Champions League. That season also saw Chelsea break some club records for the least number of goals conceded and highest number of points in a season.

 

Inconsistent results achieved during Ranieri's tenure did not satisfy many at the club, who expected actual success. Ranieri himself explained that it was difficult to mould so many new players into a team within a season and that he was 'satisfied' with his work for the season. He was criticised for his poor tactical substitutions during the semi-finals of the Champions League against AS Monaco, when the team lost 3-1 in the away leg and despite leading by two goals in the home leg eventually drew 2-2 and went out 5-3 on aggregate. Former English footballer and pundit David Platt famously used the example of Ranieri to illustrate his observation that "building a team that can win the title and actually steering this team to the title are two different matters entirely."

 

On May 31, 2004, after almost a year of speculation, he was finally relieved of his coaching duties at Chelsea, and his job went to José Mourinho, who had led F.C. Porto of the Portuguese Superliga to successive European triumphs, picking up the UEFA Cup in 2003 and then the Champions League in 2004, beating Chelsea's conquerors in the semis, Monaco.

 

Ranieri published a book named Proud Man Walking in September 2004 chronicling his last year at Chelsea. All proceeds went to London's Great Ormond Street Hospital.

 

Valencia

 

On 8 June 2004, he returned for a second stint as coach of Valencia on a three-year contract.

 

Picking up the pieces after Rafael Benítez, the manager who had led Valencia to the UEFA Cup and La Liga double the previous season, resigned and then promptly joined Liverpool. Ranieri made a series of signings from Serie A, spending the cash on Marco Di Vaio, Stefano Fiore, Bernardo Corradi and Emiliano Moretti. These four signings never really worked, after a bright start, in which the Mestalla outfit picked up 14 out of a possible 18 points and beat Porto to lift the European Super Cup, Valencia went into a slump from October, winning once in 7 games and getting knocked out of the Champions League, in no small part thanks to a humiliating 5-1 drubbing by Inter in which midfielder Miguel Angulo was sent off for spitting. After a brief revival Valencia went another 6 games without a win from mid-January. Apart from his four Italian signings Ranieri was criticised for not playing Argentinean playmaker Pablo Aimar and persistent changes to formations and tactics, something carried forward by him from his Chelsea days.

 

He was sacked on February 25, 2005 after Valencia were knocked out of the UEFA Cup by Steaua Bucharest. Valencia were sixth at the time of Ranieri's sacking.

 

Quique Sanchez Flores was announced by Valencia in June, 2005 to be Ranieri's long term successor. Prior to that Ranieri had picked up £3million from Valencia for the premature termination of his contract.

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Excellent Candidates

 

Ottmar Hitzfeld

Paul Le Guen

Claudio Ranieri

 

Decent Candidates

Paul Jewell

Paul Simpson

Aidy Boothroyd

Alan Curbishley

Chris Coleman

 

Rubbish Candidates

Graeme Souness

Bryan Robson

Glenn Hoddle

David O'leary

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Excellent Candidates

 

Ottmar Hitzfeld

Paul Le Guen

Claudio Ranieri

 

Decent Candidates

Paul Jewell

Paul Simpson

Aidy Boothroyd

Alan Curbishley

Chris Coleman

 

Rubbish Candidates

Graeme Souness

Bryan Robson bluebigeek.gif  :thbdwn:  :angryfire:

Glenn Hoddle

David O'leary

 

His name strikes fear.................hes a real possibility with FF in charge.........shudder!!!!!!!

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