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Goal-line technology for 2012/13?


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http://www.mirrorfootball.co.uk/news/Premier-League-set-introduce-goal-line-technology-start-2012-2013-season-after-FIFA-give-it-greenlight-article776948.html

Premier League 'set to introduce goal-line technology next year'

 

Published 23:01 27/07/11 By Martin Lipton

 

Goal-line technology is set to be introduced in the Premier League next year.

 

FIFA president Sepp Blatter last night gave the green light to bring in ­goal-line cameras from August 2012, as he completed his turnaround in the wake of Frank Lampard’s ‘goal that never was’ against Germany.

 

Blatter had been a fierce opponent of the idea until he and FIFA were embarrassed by the ­outrageous decision not to give England’s goal in ­Bloemfontein in last year’s World Cup.

 

Blatter said the ­decision to finally bring football up to date with other sports, like tennis, cricket and rugby, can ­effectively be made in just eight months time.

 

“At the International FA Board meeting in London in March we will make the final decision on goal-line technology,” he said.

 

“If it proves to be ­accurate and affordable then the IFAB will decide goal-line technology will be ­introduced by the 2014 World Cup.

 

“If that is the case, other nation’s associations and leagues will have the right to use this goal-line ­technology. This will be a new approach for the World Cup concerning referees.”

 

For the technology to be agreed, it has to be proven to give an accurate result, direct to the match referee rather than a fourth ­official, within one second of the ball ‘crossing the line’.

 

That seems to rule out ‘Hawkeye’ and the ­adidas-led Cairos chip-in-ball system, leaving high angle cameras likely to emerge as the chosen path.

 

If IFAB – where FIFA have four votes – agree by a majority of 6-2, the move will be ratified in July, with the Premier League then able to introduce the system in time for season 2012-13.

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Can't understand the bit about the ball chip being ruled out as too slow. Surely it'd be instant, or else why develop it?

 

Pretty sure that bit is bollocks, hawkeye is near instant too, despite how it's shown on tv.

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Can't understand the bit about the ball chip being ruled out as too slow. Surely it'd be instant, or else why develop it?

 

Pretty sure that bit is bollocks, hawkeye is near instant too, despite how it's shown on tv.

 

Aye, thought as much. Cameras alone would surely be the slowest because presumably it would rely on someone watching a replay.

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To me cameras are such a horrible way to introduce this.  They really need to come up with better technology ie: the chips.  It needs to be an instant read or nothing at all.  I saw a feature once about the chips in the ball and it was instant and connected to a buzzer in the ref's watch that would vibrate his watch if the ball went all of the way over (read: all of the chips crossed the line).  It was really good technology and also very discreet which should be one of the top priorities of this technology.  There should be no stop to play and no big lights or cameras or anything.

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Can't understand the bit about the ball chip being ruled out as too slow. Surely it'd be instant, or else why develop it?

 

I think the question with the chip was one of accuracy, rather than of delay.  At least I think I remember reading that months ago.

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http://www.mirrorfootball.co.uk/news/Premier-League-set-introduce-goal-line-technology-start-2012-2013-season-after-FIFA-give-it-greenlight-article776948.html

Premier League 'set to introduce goal-line technology next year'

 

Published 23:01 27/07/11 By Martin Lipton

 

Goal-line technology is set to be introduced in the Premier League next year.

 

FIFA president Sepp Blatter last night gave the green light to bring in ­goal-line cameras from August 2012, as he completed his turnaround in the wake of Frank Lampard’s ‘goal that never was’ against Germany.

 

Blatter had been a fierce opponent of the idea until he and FIFA were embarrassed by the ­outrageous decision not to give England’s goal in ­Bloemfontein in last year’s World Cup.

 

Blatter said the ­decision to finally bring football up to date with other sports, like tennis, cricket and rugby, can ­effectively be made in just eight months time.

 

“At the International FA Board meeting in London in March we will make the final decision on goal-line technology,” he said.

 

“If it proves to be ­accurate and affordable then the IFAB will decide goal-line technology will be ­introduced by the 2014 World Cup.

 

“If that is the case, other nation’s associations and leagues will have the right to use this goal-line ­technology. This will be a new approach for the World Cup concerning referees.”

 

For the technology to be agreed, it has to be proven to give an accurate result, direct to the match referee rather than a fourth ­official, within one second of the ball ‘crossing the line’.

 

That seems to rule out ‘Hawkeye’ and the ­adidas-led Cairos chip-in-ball system, leaving high angle cameras likely to emerge as the chosen path.

 

If IFAB – where FIFA have four votes – agree by a majority of 6-2, the move will be ratified in July, with the Premier League then able to introduce the system in time for season 2012-13.

 

That doesn't even make any sense.

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I'm content with introducing technology, providing it's for no other purpose than to determine whether or not the ball has crossed the line. The only fear i have is of some kind of tecchy domino effect, where we're halting play to look at offside decisions/whether the keeper's come off his line for a pen/if the centre-back took the ball or the man.

 

Providing it doesn't snowball into some Hawkeye system like in tennis or cricket*, i'm all for it. The scoring of goals, obviously, is the absolute fundamental of the entire sport itself. Situations like the England/Germany WC one are inexcusable imo. It's the only situation - in the whole sport - whereby a camera (or preferably a chip) can have veto-power over the human eye. Imo.

 

Mind, i'd still prefer a 'goal-line official' to any form of technology.

 

 

 

 

 

*where it says in the article about 'bringing football up to date with tennis and cricket', i disagree - it's not about us 'catching up'. Football isn't a sport where you get the buzz from sitting in your seat, looking at a screen to see if the computerised, colourful line goes over another line... we're not as gimmicky as that. It doesn't suit football in the same way it does other sports.

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4th official sat on touchline watching monitors with several different angles. Direct line to referee - could tell him almost instantly.

 

I've been saying this for nearly 6 years :razz:

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4th official sat on touchline watching monitors with several different angles. Direct line to referee - could tell him almost instantly.

 

I've been saying this for nearly 6 years :razz:

 

Would still require a pause in play.

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I know people who actually work at Hawk-Eye and the system they've produced works nicely but it still requires a person/people to accurately set up and test the system each matchday, press a button to run a program every time there is an incident and then press a button to send the results to the referee. Combined with the huge price they'd no doubt be asking (similar technologies have emerged in recent years and Hawk-Eye could soon be pushed out of both cricket and tennis so they've got to watch their backs), this is probably a relative weak option.

 

The chip in ball technology seems the most viable to me personally but again this has problems. It works well in a fairly empty stadium but once you get thousands of people carrying items that interfere with the communication systems, the accuracy and reliabity drops. However, I'm not sure why it needs to be this complicated as the majority of these systems use devices in the posts that could easily have a flashing light near the goal. Obviously output is a concern for FIFA and what works best for the officials and supporters. Very few changes need to be made to the balls themselves as the 'chip' can be built into the inner layers of the ball material - electronic webbing could also be used.

 

Radar type cameras that monitor the balls movements are very discreet and are actually used at the moment to record movements of players etc. Again it needs extensive setting up but the major problem would be the several cameras being blocked by players, similar to the officials eye line being blocked. Other problems include when the ball compresses down and reforms shape due a compact and cameras picking up second balls or alien items.

 

Although I have a good understanding of the current systems, I'm no expert. However, every system will have their flaws and these need to be reduced or erased completely. Most of the systems work in theory but may not in a 50k packed stadium. For me, the 'chip' or electronic mesh in the ball in theory works the best and I guess a system extremely similar will be used - the performance of the ball can not be influenced simply to include the technology.

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4th official sat on touchline watching monitors with several different angles. Direct line to referee - could tell him almost instantly.

 

I've been saying this for nearly 6 years :razz:

 

Would still require a pause in play.

 

Surely if the ball bounces just over the line and out, they could play on if the ref wasn't sure, and if the 4th official says it was a goal then they stop the game and award the goal....

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Always been against video technology really... just think football should be a human game and incorrect decisions are part and parcel of it.

 

I would rather we spent more time educating players and managers to respect refereeing decisions.

 

(I don't expect anyone to agree with this BTW!)

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I know people who actually work at Hawk-Eye and the system they've produced works nicely but it still requires a person/people to accurately set up and test the system each matchday, press a button to run a program every time there is an incident and then press a button to send the results to the referee. Combined with the huge price they'd no doubt be asking (similar technologies have emerged in recent years and Hawk-Eye could soon be pushed out of both cricket and tennis so they've got to watch their backs), this is probably a relative weak option.

 

The chip in ball technology seems the most viable to me personally but again this has problems. It works well in a fairly empty stadium but once you get thousands of people carrying items that interfere with the communication systems, the accuracy and reliabity drops. However, I'm not sure why it needs to be this complicated as the majority of these systems use devices in the posts that could easily have a flashing light near the goal. Obviously output is a concern for FIFA and what works best for the officials and supporters. Very few changes need to be made to the balls themselves as the 'chip' can be built into the inner layers of the ball material - electronic webbing could also be used.

 

Radar type cameras that monitor the balls movements are very discreet and are actually used at the moment to record movements of players etc. Again it needs extensive setting up but the major problem would be the several cameras being blocked by players, similar to the officials eye line being blocked. Other problems include when the ball compresses down and reforms shape due a compact and cameras picking up second balls or alien items.

 

Although I have a good understanding of the current systems, I'm no expert. However, every system will have their flaws and these need to be reduced or erased completely. Most of the systems work in theory but may not in a 50k packed stadium. For me, the 'chip' or electronic mesh in the ball in theory works the best and I guess a system extremely similar will be used - the performance of the ball can not be influenced simply to include the technology.

 

Will the FA pick up the bill for the league two teams who will need to start using the technology ?

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Guest BlacknWhiteArmy

Always been against video technology really... just think football should be a human game and incorrect decisions are part and parcel of it.

 

I would rather we spent more time educating players and managers to respect refereeing decisions.

 

(I don't expect anyone to agree with this BTW!)

 

I do. Completely agree.

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