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Everton manager Rafa Benítez


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'Benitez was handed just £1.7 million for five summer signings. Some problem areas in the squad were simply not addressed. 

 

He is recasting Everton in a different image; one that favours collective effort over individualism and aims to improve the resources already at his disposal. An initial squad audit, conducted as he homed in on the job this summer, identified a lack of pace in wide areas and the need to provide a regular supply of crosses to an aerially dominant Calvert-Lewin. It also highlighted a lack of reliable ball-playing options at centre-back and the largely untapped potential of fringe players such as Alex Iwobi.

 

From the very first day, training has been tough, something already noted by players both in public and private. Keen to reduce the number of injury occurrences at the club, Benitez appointed a new head of sports science in Jamie Harley. Double sessions in the Orlando heat during the Florida Cup, designed with Harley’s input, had two overarching aims: improve the fitness of the group and quickly instil certain key tactical messaging. 

 

“He has been clear with them what he expects in training, and why,” says a source close to the Spaniard. “It’s been about intensity. A lot of managers say they’ve come in and got the players fitter, but Rafa really has. He tells them, ‘We’re going to go hard with a higher intensity in training because we need to be like that in matches’. He communicates what he requires, and why.”

 

Where certain younger players within the squad felt guidance was lacking under Ancelotti, particularly as they sought to rectify recurrent flaws in their own games, Benitez has taken a hands-on role in training. Players are given individual feedback and instructions. Wingers and forwards have targets for goals and assists; defenders are taught about body position and spatial awareness. At the end of sessions and games, the manager usually makes a point of heading over to a small number of players to provide feedback. Assistant Paco de Miguel and analyst Antonio Gomez have been known to highlight the good work of young players and provide encouragement.

 

“People say Rafa never puts his arms around players, and that’s true in the sense he won’t be hugging them all the time or saying he loves their new haircut or something,” says the source.

 

“He will put an arm around them and say, ‘Have you ever thought that when X makes that run, you could cut inside and do this?’ — he’s always coaching.

 

“He’ll say to Dominic (Calvert-Lewin), ‘When Demarai gets the ball, why not try this run to the near post?’, or, ‘Have you noticed that Demarai plays that ball a lot? If you make this run, you’ll have a chance when he does that’.

 

“(Midfielder) Abdoulaye Doucoure is another case in point. Rafa said he stood out for Watford against Newcastle and that he’s always liked him. He spoke to him a lot. Doucoure was maybe thinking that because he was at Everton he had to be playing lots of passes but Rafa told him, ‘These are your strengths, play to them’. He broke it down. ‘Win the ball, give it to someone and then get yourself up around the box’.

 

“Players respond to him, because they really sense he can improve them.”'

 

 

 

 

We gave him away so we could buy Steve Bruce for £6.5million. :thup:

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'For Benitez, punctuality is crucial. If players are late for training there is a system of fines — and there are no exceptions.

 

“You might get someone really honest and dependable like Seamus whose car will break down, it’s not his fault, and he’ll ring ahead,” says a source. “Rafa wouldn’t hammer him but he’d say, ‘We will still need to work something out for your fine — maybe it’s paying for a meal with the team’.

 

“It doesn’t matter who you are — everyone plays by the same rules.

 

“It’s the same in training. No favourites. If anything, Rafa will probably push the better players even harder because he knows that they’re capable of more.”'

 

 

 

Kill iz. 

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I used to love reading all those articles and quotes from former players when Rafa signed for us. Nothing makes you feel better than knowing you have a manager who understands the game at such a deep level.  Honestly felt like we had become a proper club again after more than a decade. 

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The more I think about it, the more I think Ashley is such a spiteful cunt. 
 

Ashley would get more money/exposure having Rafa running the show than practically any other manager. Getting rid of him was surely motivated by his loathing of the fans. 

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1 hour ago, r0cafella said:

The more I think about it, the more I think Ashley is such a spiteful cunt. 
 

Ashley would get more money/exposure having Rafa running the show than practically any other manager. Getting rid of him was surely motivated by his loathing of the fans. 

He also needs yes men under him 

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2 hours ago, Ben said:

He also needs yes men under him 

 

He has one: Charnley. 

 

"Give Rafa what be needs and let him run my football club. Don't ever talk to me again."

 

Literally all he needed to do. 

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On 10/09/2021 at 13:46, Yorkie said:

'Benitez was handed just £1.7 million for five summer signings. Some problem areas in the squad were simply not addressed. 

 

He is recasting Everton in a different image; one that favours collective effort over individualism and aims to improve the resources already at his disposal. An initial squad audit, conducted as he homed in on the job this summer, identified a lack of pace in wide areas and the need to provide a regular supply of crosses to an aerially dominant Calvert-Lewin. It also highlighted a lack of reliable ball-playing options at centre-back and the largely untapped potential of fringe players such as Alex Iwobi.

 

From the very first day, training has been tough, something already noted by players both in public and private. Keen to reduce the number of injury occurrences at the club, Benitez appointed a new head of sports science in Jamie Harley. Double sessions in the Orlando heat during the Florida Cup, designed with Harley’s input, had two overarching aims: improve the fitness of the group and quickly instil certain key tactical messaging. 

 

“He has been clear with them what he expects in training, and why,” says a source close to the Spaniard. “It’s been about intensity. A lot of managers say they’ve come in and got the players fitter, but Rafa really has. He tells them, ‘We’re going to go hard with a higher intensity in training because we need to be like that in matches’. He communicates what he requires, and why.”

 

Where certain younger players within the squad felt guidance was lacking under Ancelotti, particularly as they sought to rectify recurrent flaws in their own games, Benitez has taken a hands-on role in training. Players are given individual feedback and instructions. Wingers and forwards have targets for goals and assists; defenders are taught about body position and spatial awareness. At the end of sessions and games, the manager usually makes a point of heading over to a small number of players to provide feedback. Assistant Paco de Miguel and analyst Antonio Gomez have been known to highlight the good work of young players and provide encouragement.

 

“People say Rafa never puts his arms around players, and that’s true in the sense he won’t be hugging them all the time or saying he loves their new haircut or something,” says the source.

 

“He will put an arm around them and say, ‘Have you ever thought that when X makes that run, you could cut inside and do this?’ — he’s always coaching.

 

“He’ll say to Dominic (Calvert-Lewin), ‘When Demarai gets the ball, why not try this run to the near post?’, or, ‘Have you noticed that Demarai plays that ball a lot? If you make this run, you’ll have a chance when he does that’.

 

“(Midfielder) Abdoulaye Doucoure is another case in point. Rafa said he stood out for Watford against Newcastle and that he’s always liked him. He spoke to him a lot. Doucoure was maybe thinking that because he was at Everton he had to be playing lots of passes but Rafa told him, ‘These are your strengths, play to them’. He broke it down. ‘Win the ball, give it to someone and then get yourself up around the box’.

 

“Players respond to him, because they really sense he can improve them.”'

 

 

 

 

We gave him away so we could buy Steve Bruce for £6.5million. :thup:

 

Bruce: Not enough clogers at the back, sells the ball players. Who needs to analyse players? Put your most expensive side on, shoe horn them into unfamiliar positions and hope they create some majik. Prevent injury by only training 1 or 2 days a week. 1 point in 3 games? Take a holiday, you deserve it! Recharge the batteries for more off the cuff excuses and blame game ideas.

 

5. Profit.

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As sad as reading these sorts of quotes are, there is definitely the hope that post-Ashley it could very well be us sitting here with a modern manager coaching players in a revamped training facility with a squad of elite coaches. Regardless of who takes us over, Saudis, a local tramp or somewhere in between - we're going to be better off. Just ride out the next few years.

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25 minutes ago, Dr.Spaceman said:

As sad as reading these sorts of quotes are, there is definitely the hope that post-Ashley it could very well be us sitting here with a modern manager coaching players in a revamped training facility with a squad of elite coaches. Regardless of who takes us over, Saudis, a local tramp or somewhere in between - we're going to be better off. Just ride out the next few years.

There is no 'post-Ashley' - I am resigned it's not happening.  We are just not that lucky.

 

 

Edited by duo

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32 minutes ago, Dr.Spaceman said:

As sad as reading these sorts of quotes are, there is definitely the hope that post-Ashley it could very well be us sitting here with a modern manager coaching players in a revamped training facility with a squad of elite coaches. Regardless of who takes us over, Saudis, a local tramp or somewhere in between - we're going to be better off. Just ride out the next few years.

 

Agreed. As painful as it is in some respects (only specifically because it's Rafa), it does give me hope for the future. We're the exception these days, we're the only ones not trying to progress. As soon as he's gone we'll be joining everyone else in trying to be the best we can be, and deep down I'm excited for that day. 

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5 hours ago, Dr.Spaceman said:

As sad as reading these sorts of quotes are, there is definitely the hope that post-Ashley it could very well be us sitting here with a modern manager coaching players in a revamped training facility with a squad of elite coaches. Regardless of who takes us over, Saudis, a local tramp or somewhere in between - we're going to be better off. Just ride out the next few years.

 

Aye, 15 years though, if he's not gone soon it'll be a generation of the vindictive cunt. ANY other club in and around the Premiership and this would be an utter scandal, but we just have to watch while we get blamed for not being thankful enough for his ownership.

 

Honestly I wished I could see any end to it but I just can't. He won't sell for anything less than his greedy parasitic mitts want, and the only party willing to pay him, are being blocked because it would threaten the Judas 6 from their money.

 

 

 

Edited by Bimpy474

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36 minutes ago, ManDoon said:

He will die eventually. Then we get the guy who married his daughter, the club promoter. It’s all good times ahead!

 

:lol:  

 

It's kind of sad, but unless we get a PIF type of takeover, these are the type of chancers we are probably going to attract sadly. 

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1 hour ago, ManDoon said:

He will die eventually. Then we get the guy who married his daughter, the club promoter. It’s all good times ahead!


the club promoter who’s about to be The new ceo of Fraser’s and who’s actually done a brilliant job of turning their company around and modernizing the model a bit (just looking at earnings and info read in press). I’d take him over Ma and LC! 

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I haven’t looked at their earnings but I’m going out on a limb and say whatever turnaround is happening will be short lived, those places are finished. Either way though, we’ve already had someone who excelled in retail (Ashley), I’d rather have no one connected to his family here. 

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1 hour ago, ManDoon said:

He will die eventually. Then we get the guy who married his daughter, the club promoter. It’s all good times ahead!

 

:lol: I just got so tired reading that.

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Another important function managers look for when bringing players they know to new clubs is for them to tell their team-mates about what to expect from the boss.

 

Benitez has now signed both Rondon and Townsend at Everton.

 

“If you have a player who knows how you work, and what’s coming in training, they can help spread the message in the dressing room — particularly if they’re a good mixer,” explains a source close to Benitez.

 

“In general, players get used to what they’re doing on a day-to-day basis and they like the routine.

 

“Under the last couple of managers (at Everton) it’s been a bit more low-key. Under Rafa, it’s intense and you need players who know why he trains like that to almost become pseudo coaches. They can break it down for their team-mates and ease it, because you’ll always get players who will say, ‘I’ve never had to train like this and I don’t like it’.

 

“Sal and Andros can say it’s worth it and it’s helped them improve in the past.”

 

Benitez is obsessive and meticulous in his role, always focusing on the little details that make players better.

 

“It’s something I love,” Rondon said in a previous interview with The Athletic.

 

“I remember our first meeting, the day I passed my medical and signed. I was waiting for the paperwork to go through. He talked to me for 45 minutes! I was in his office and he drew a horizontal line on a whiteboard and then a picture of a goal.

 

“‘What’s that?’ he asked me. ‘Er… A pitch?’ I said. ‘No’, he said, ‘you can go back to West Brom. This is a target. A target. Are you a striker?’ ‘Yes, I’m a striker,’ I said. ‘Well, where should you shoot?’ ‘Umm. Wherever the keeper can’t reach it?’ I asked. ‘No. Where? Which side?’

 

“So, on the drawing, he divided the goal into six squares. He told me the maximum percentage for goals is in the bottom left and bottom right corners. ‘If you shoot there and miss high, you still might score’, he said. ‘I know strikers want to score goals with quality and style, but shoot here and you’ll score. Pass the ball into the net. Pass, pass!’

 

“It went on for a long time, but it was really good. I’m still learning from him.”

 

Benitez may be a forward-thinking coach but like many others of his profession, it seems the benefits of signing players (most obviously Rondon) again and again are sometimes just too compelling to dismiss.

 

 

 

 

No thank you ill have a steve bruce instead please

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15 hours ago, Yorkie said:

Another important function managers look for when bringing players they know to new clubs is for them to tell their team-mates about what to expect from the boss.

 

Benitez has now signed both Rondon and Townsend at Everton.

 

“If you have a player who knows how you work, and what’s coming in training, they can help spread the message in the dressing room — particularly if they’re a good mixer,” explains a source close to Benitez.

 

“In general, players get used to what they’re doing on a day-to-day basis and they like the routine.

 

“Under the last couple of managers (at Everton) it’s been a bit more low-key. Under Rafa, it’s intense and you need players who know why he trains like that to almost become pseudo coaches. They can break it down for their team-mates and ease it, because you’ll always get players who will say, ‘I’ve never had to train like this and I don’t like it’.

 

“Sal and Andros can say it’s worth it and it’s helped them improve in the past.”

 

Benitez is obsessive and meticulous in his role, always focusing on the little details that make players better.

 

“It’s something I love,” Rondon said in a previous interview with The Athletic.

 

“I remember our first meeting, the day I passed my medical and signed. I was waiting for the paperwork to go through. He talked to me for 45 minutes! I was in his office and he drew a horizontal line on a whiteboard and then a picture of a goal.

 

“‘What’s that?’ he asked me. ‘Er… A pitch?’ I said. ‘No’, he said, ‘you can go back to West Brom. This is a target. A target. Are you a striker?’ ‘Yes, I’m a striker,’ I said. ‘Well, where should you shoot?’ ‘Umm. Wherever the keeper can’t reach it?’ I asked. ‘No. Where? Which side?’

 

“So, on the drawing, he divided the goal into six squares. He told me the maximum percentage for goals is in the bottom left and bottom right corners. ‘If you shoot there and miss high, you still might score’, he said. ‘I know strikers want to score goals with quality and style, but shoot here and you’ll score. Pass the ball into the net. Pass, pass!’

 

“It went on for a long time, but it was really good. I’m still learning from him.”

 

Benitez may be a forward-thinking coach but like many others of his profession, it seems the benefits of signing players (most obviously Rondon) again and again are sometimes just too compelling to dismiss.

 

 

 

 

No thank you ill have a steve bruce instead please

Bill Parcells was famous for bringing in a few of "his guys" even if they were almost done as players.  They set the example and helped secure buy in from all the players.

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